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A tale of two traditions in applied sport psychology: the heyday of Soviet sport and wake-up calls for North America
Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6198-0784
University of Tennessee, United States.
University of Tennessee, United States.
2006 (English)In: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, ISSN 1041-3200, E-ISSN 1533-1571, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 173-184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper is the second of two essays designed to acquaint English-speaking readers with the work of Avksenty Tcezarevich Puni (1898-1986), one of the fathers of Russian sport psychology. In our previous essay "The Russian origins of sport psychology: a translation of an early work of A. Tc. Puni" (Ryba, Stambulova, & Wrisberg, 2005), we discussed Puni's innovative ideas of psychological preparation of athletes based on his classic paper "Psychological preparation of athletes for a competition" that was published in 1963. In that essay, we grounded Puni's pioneering work within the specific socio-political and historical context of his era by providing a brief overview of his life (including extensive explanatory footnotes) in pre- and post-Socialist Revolution Russia. In this paper, we attempt to further historicize the work of Puni on the psychological preparation of athletes by discussing his ground-breaking model of Psychological Preparation for a Competition (PPC) and contrasting that work with the activity of sport psychology consultants taking place in North America during the same time period (i.e., 1960s and 1970s). In a concluding section, we will discuss some of the lessons sport psychology consultants have learned in the decades since Puni developed his model and suggest some ways future models might expand on Puni's view of the provision of psychological assistance for athletes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2006. Vol. 18, no 3, p. 173-184
Keywords [en]
applied sport psychology, Soviet discourse, North American discourse, psychological preparation for competitions, self-efficacy, performance, anxiety
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-4878DOI: 10.1080/10413200600830182ISI: 000240090000001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-33748654226OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-4878DiVA, id: diva2:325501
Available from: 2010-06-18 Created: 2010-06-18 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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Stambulova, Natalia B.

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
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  • vancouver
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