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The association among hypertension and reduced psychological well-being, anxiety and sleep disturbances: a population study
Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
Univ Gothenburg, Dept Primary Hlth Care, Gothenburg, Sweden .
2010 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 366-371Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hypertension (HP) is a serious condition affecting about one quarter of all adults, both men and women. Genetic and environmental factors are of importance in its aetiology, while psychosocial factors may also play a role. This study focused on psychosocial factors and examined the association among reduced psychological well-being, anxiety, sleep disturbances and HP by comparing people with HP and the general population. A national survey of 12 166 individuals (hypertensives n = 2047; rest of population n = 10 119) was conducted using two-step multiple logistic regression with an odds ratio and a 95% confidence interval. The study is in accordance with Swedish legislation pertaining to ethics. Reduced psychological well-being, anxiety and sleep disturbances were higher in the HP group and, in addition, reduced psychological well-being was, still higher in the presence of severe anxiety and serious sleep disturbances. These three factors are of major importance for HP, but it is difficult to know whether they are causes or consequences. In order to prevent HP, support for people who exhibit such risk factors should be a matter of high priority.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2010. Vol. 24, no 2, p. 366-371
Keywords [en]
hypertension, psychosocial factors, anxiety, sleep disturbances, prevention, ambulatory blood-pressure, job strain, young-adults, follow-up, risk, health, women, men, symptoms
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-4737DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2009.00730.xISI: 000277713500021PubMedID: 20102543Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77954009916OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-4737DiVA, id: diva2:324144
Available from: 2010-06-14 Created: 2010-06-14 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved

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Hildingh, Cathrine

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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