hh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Sleep difficulties, daytime sleepiness, and health-related quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure
Linköping University, Department of Cardiology.
Linköping University, Department of Cardiology.
Linköping University, Department of Cardiology.
Linköping University, Department of Cardiology.
2004 (English)In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 234-242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Normal sleep changes with age in duration, fragmentation, and depth. The prevalence of insomnia is high in the elderly general population. In patients with chronic heart failure (HF) objective sleep assessments have shown disturbances such as a shorter total duration of sleep, frequent arousals, and sleep stage changes. Objective: To describe self- assessed sleep difficulties, daytime sleepiness, and their relation to health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in men and women with HF, as well as to make a comparison to data from a norm population. Methods: Cross-sectional design including 223 patients with HF, New York Heart Association classification II-IV, assessed using the Uppsala Sleep Inventory-Chronic Heart Failure, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, and Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire. Results: The most commonly reported sleep difficulties were initiating and maintaining sleep. The ratio of habitual sleep to the amount of estimated need for sleep was significantly shorter for women (P < .05), and the number of awakenings per night was significantly increased for men (P < .001). A total of 21% suffered from daytime sleepiness. Patients suffering from difficulties maintaining sleep, initiating sleep, and early morning awakenings reported significantly lower HRQOL in almost all dimensions of the SF-36 (P < .05-P < .001) compared to patients without sleeping difficulties, as well as to the normal population. The disease-specific Minnesota living With Heart Failure Questionnaire showed significantly reduced (P < .05-P < 001) HRQOL as measured by the total and subscale scores for patients suffering from sleeping difficulties compared to patients without sleeping difficulties. Conclusion: Patients with, HF have a reduced HRQOL especially if difficulties maintaining sleep, initiating sleep, and early morning awakenings are involved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins , 2004. Vol. 19, no 4, p. 234-242
Keywords [en]
insomnia, older people, drowsiness, sleep deprivation, sleep disorders, wakefulness, health-related quality of life, heart failure, sleep
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-3369DOI: 10.1016/j.ejcnurse.2005.04.005PubMedID: 15326979Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-4444257335OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-3369DiVA, id: diva2:300191
Available from: 2010-02-25 Created: 2009-12-01 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus
In the same journal
Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 52 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf