hh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Ethnocentricity in top marketing journals
Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
2005 (English)In: Marketing Intelligence & Planning, ISSN 0263-4503, E-ISSN 1758-8049, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 422-434Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

To draw up a demographic profile of editors, editorial boards and contributors, in the specific case of one top-ranked marketing journal, and to discuss the implications.

Design/methodology/approach

From a list of top-ranked titles, compiled from various sources, one was chosen as a case study. Demographic data relating to contributors and editors were collected by inspection, for a five-year period. The anonymity of the journal was preserved.

Findings

North American affiliations dominated among authors, editors and editorial boards. Successive editors have had an American affiliation for many years. This strongly skewed demographic profile raises a number of doubts and questions. The author suggests that one important effect is a kind of academic myopia, caused by demographic uniformity and paradigmatic inertia. He contends that this phenomenon threatens to weaken the scientific reputation of the marketing discipline and its research community.

Research limitations/implications

The study is restricted to a single top-ranked journal, which is anonymous because the aim is not to focus attention, negative or positive, on a single case, but rather to stimulate debate.

Practical implications

Tentative recommendations are offered to the publishers and editors of marketing journals for reduction of the specific and general damaging effects of demographically induced academic myopia.

Originality/value

This study sows the seed and provides the trigger for further research and discussion of a phenomenon with important practical implications for the academic marketing community.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2005. Vol. 23, no 5, p. 422-434
Keywords [en]
Demographic Characteristics, Ethnocentrism, Marketing, Case studies, Inertia, Product management, Serials
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-3522DOI: 10.1108/02634500510612618Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-23944498879OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-3522DiVA, id: diva2:288972
Available from: 2010-01-22 Created: 2009-12-01 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Svensson, Göran

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Svensson, Göran
By organisation
Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL)
In the same journal
Marketing Intelligence & Planning
Business Administration

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 200 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf