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Influencing Exercise Adherence in Physically Non-active Young Women: Suggestion for a Model
Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8345-8994
Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
1999 (English)In: Women in Sport & Physical Activity Journal, ISSN 1063-6161, E-ISSN 1938-1581, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 17-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to develop a theoretical understanding of what could influence exercise adherence in physically non-active young women. Interviews with twelve physically non-active young women werw strategically selected and analyzed by grounded theory. The results were that several factors could influence exercise adherence in physically non-active young women, and that these factors can be regarded as a number of interrelated dimensions. The influence was coming either from the exercise or from the environment connected to the exercise. The participants wanted to feel enjoyment and to learn something during the exercise (recreation/learning influence). They also wanted to feel belongingness during the exercise (social influence). An influence that promotes health or builds skills (investment influence) could be a trigger to start exercising among the participants, but not to maintain exercise adherence. Influence coming from the environment (enabling influence) was both important and stimulating for physically non-active young women in establishing regular exercise. It is important to present the model developed in this study to communities, sport federations and other authorities working with health promotion activities so that they can explore innovative ways to promote exercise adherence among physically non-active young women. Good examples could be to offer non-cometitive sports as well as to develop well-designed exercise programs for physically non-active young women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Reston, United States: National Association for Girls and Women in Sport , 1999. Vol. 8, no 2, p. 17-44
Keywords [en]
exercise, young women, physically non-active, grounded theory
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-2928Local ID: 2082/3330OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-2928DiVA, id: diva2:240146
Available from: 2009-09-04 Created: 2009-09-04 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved

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Lindgren, Eva-CarinFridlund, Bengt

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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