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A Survey of Bio-Inspired and Other Alternative Architectures
Portland State University.
2008 (English)In: Nanotechnology. Vol. 4, Information technology II / [ed] Rainer Waser, Weinheim: Wiley-VCH , 2008, 251-282 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter I have provided a brief and somewhat superficial survey of the specialized hardware developed over

the last 20 years to support neurobiological models of computation. I then looked briefly at current efforts and

speculated on how such hardware, especially when implemented in nanoscale electronics, could offer unprecedented

compute density, possibly leading to new capabilities in computational intelligence. Also, biologically inspired

models seem to be a better match to nano-scale circuits.

The mix of continued Moore’s law scaling, models from computational neuroscience, and molecular scale

technology portends a potential paradigm shift in how computing is done. Among other things the future of

computing is probably not about discrete logic, but about the encoding, learning, and performing inference over

stochastic variables. There could be a wide range of applications for devices like this in robotics, the reduction and

compression of widely distributed sensor data, power management, etc.

One of the leading lights of the first computer revolution saw this clearly. At the IEEE Centenary in 1984 (“The

Next 100 Years,” IEEE Technical Convocation), Dr. Robert Noyce, co-founder of Intel and co-inventor of the

Integrated Circuit, said:

Until now we have been going the other way; that is, in order to understand the brain we have

used the computer as a model for it. Perhaps it is time to reverse this reasoning: to understand

where we should go with the computer, we should look to the brain for some clues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Weinheim: Wiley-VCH , 2008. 251-282 p.
Keyword [en]
Nanotechnology, Nanostructures, Nanoelectronics
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-2307Local ID: 2082/2709ISBN: 978-3-527-31737-0 OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-2307DiVA: diva2:239525
Available from: 2009-02-17 Created: 2009-02-17 Last updated: 2009-12-22Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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