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Motivation to exercise and Percieved Barriers - Men and Women's Exercise Habits
Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
2008 (English)In: Proceedings of the Nordic Conference 2008: Health, Participation and Effects of Sport and Exercise / [ed] Björn A. Carlsson, Urban Johnson, Karin A. Josefsson, Natalia Stambulova, Halmstad: Halmstad University , 2008, 58-59 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Regular exercise habits are hard for many people both regarding establishment and adherence, which in many cases is caused by lack of motivation. Since the human body needs a certain amount of physical activity to function properly it is important to help people to motivate themselves in order to promote physical and mental health in society (Lindwall & Faskunger, 2003). The interest in motivation related research is, according to Roberts (2001) huge and holds as much as one third of all psychological research. A comparatively small part of this research treats perceived barriers to exercise and how individuals overcome these obstacles to adhere to their exercise habits over time. Such knowledge could be useful to challenge the drop-out rates by helping those who recently have initiated new exercise habits to maintain them, e.g. by providing useful strategies to overcome these barriers. These strategies could consist of predetermined coping strategies and alternatives to use when facing obstacles towards planned activities. The theoretical framework used was Achievement Goal Theory (Dweck, 1986; Dweck & Elliot, 1983; Maer & Nicholls, 1980; Nicholls, 1981; 1984; 1989 ref. ur Roberts, 2001), Expectancy-Value Theory (Eccles et. al 1983, 1984 ref. in Eccles & Whigfield, 2002), Relapse Prevention Theory (Brownell, Marlatt, Lichtenstein & Wilson, 1986), Self-Efficacy Theory (Bandura, 1977 ref. in Bandura, 2001) and Social Exchange Theory (Thibaut och Kelley, 1959).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Halmstad: Halmstad University , 2008. 58-59 p.
Keyword [en]
barriers, exercise, motivation
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-2036Local ID: 2082/2431OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-2036DiVA: diva2:239254
Conference
Nordic Conference 2008: Health, Participation and Effects of Sport and Exercise,October 2–4, Halmstad University, Sweden
Available from: 2013-05-15 Created: 2008-10-13 Last updated: 2014-04-23Bibliographically approved

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cec8ca026767853dd3b0d987f87ce3d04d208a0817046a387dd59ebf34ad12489d6930f0784d00f9c40fcaa4e6089499a299ee015a0eee3791190cfd242191bf
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf