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The subjective meaning of dentition and oral health: Struggling to optimize one's self-esteem
Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
Nobel Biocare AB, Göteborg, Sweden.
2007 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, E-ISSN 1748-2623, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 86-92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to explore what dentition and oral health mean to adult dental care patients' well-being. Qualitative, taped interviews were conducted with 15 participants (over 20 years of age), who were patients at private and public dental health care units in the western part of Sweden. The constant comparative method of grounded theory was used. The interviews were consecutively analyzed in hierarchical coding processes until saturation was achieved. A conceptual model was generated illuminating the meaning of dentition and oral health for the participant's well-being. The core category of the model, struggling to optimize one's self-esteem, was related to four categories, which further described the psychosocial process of increasing one's self-esteem and contributing to well-being. These categories were labelled investing in oneself, being attractive to others, being able to socialize and showing ones social belonging. People who are satisfied with their teeth in terms of function and appearance seem to have developed an optimized self-esteem, which contributes to the well-being in individuals. Consequently, inequalities in oral health according to social belonging may lead to inequalities in self-esteem and well-being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basingstoke: Taylor & Francis, 2007. Vol. 2, no 2, p. 86-92
Keywords [en]
Qualitative studies, Interview, Dentition, Oral health, Well-being, Self-esteem, Grounded theory
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-1462DOI: 10.1080/17482620701320786Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-72449124846Local ID: 2082/1842OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-1462DiVA, id: diva2:238680
Available from: 2008-05-30 Created: 2008-05-30 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved

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Hallberg, Ulrika

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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