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Effect of rough surface anisotropy on friction in gears
Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
2002 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: Chalmers tekniska högsk. , 2002. , p. vii, 28
Series
Thesis for the degree of licentiate of engineering, ISSN 1651-0984 ; 8
Keywords [en]
Friction, Surface topography, Roughness, Lay, Gears, Efficiency, Power transmission
National Category
Engineering and Technology Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-1376Libris ID: 8883095Local ID: 2082/1755OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-1376DiVA, id: diva2:238594
Presentation
(English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

Funding: The Swedish Board for Vehicular Research & Volvo

Available from: 2008-04-29 Created: 2008-04-29 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. An Experimental Study on the Effect of Surface Topography on Rough Friction in Gears
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Experimental Study on the Effect of Surface Topography on Rough Friction in Gears
2001 (English)In: Proceedings of the JSME International Conference on Motion and Power Transmissions: MPT2001-Fukuoka; November 15 - 17, 2001, Fukuoka, The Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers , 2001, Vol. 2, p. 547-552Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2001
Keywords
Surface Topography, Friction, Roughness, Gears, Efficiency
National Category
Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-30829 (URN)
Conference
The JSME International Conference on Motion and Power Transmissions, Fukoka, Japan, November 15-17, 2001
Note

Funding: Swedish Board for Vehicular Research & Volvo

Available from: 2016-05-03 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
2. A study on the effect of surface topography on rough friction in roller contact
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A study on the effect of surface topography on rough friction in roller contact
2003 (English)In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 254, no 11, p. 1162-1169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The friction behaviour of gear teeth in the context of tribology can have a strong effect on housing vibration, noise and efficiency. One of the parameters that greatly influences the friction under certain running conditions is surface roughness. In this work, rough friction was studied in lubricated sliding of roller surfaces, which were manufactured to simulate the real gear surfaces. By examining 3D surface topography of two mating bodies, both surface roughness and its effect on friction behaviour can be studied. In a previous study, a rough-friction test rig has been designed, constructed and initially verified. The types of surfaces involved in this study are ground, shot-peened, phosphated and electrochemically deburred. These rollers were subjected to the same friction testing procedures. Roller surfaces were then examined, and correlation between the topography and the frictional behaviour was analysed. Friction behaviour was interpreted in terms of Stribeck curves (friction coefficient as the function of Hersey parameter (ην/p)). The results showed that electrochemically deburred and certain phosphated surfaces provide lower friction coefficient values which are competitive to fine-ground surfaces in lubricated rolling/sliding contact. © 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2003
Keywords
Surface Topography, Wear of materials, Friction, Rolling, Sliding mode control, Surface roughness, Tribology, Gears
National Category
Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-3560 (URN)10.1016/S0043-1648(03)00329-6 (DOI)000185448900016 ()2-s2.0-0042856282 (Scopus ID)
Conference
10th Nordic Conference on Tribology, NORDTRIB 2002, 9-12th June, KTH, Stockholm, Sweden, 2002
Note

Funding: Volvo Car Corporation (VCC), Volvo Technological Development Corporation (VTDC) & the Swedish Board for Vehicular Research

Available from: 2010-01-08 Created: 2009-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
3. Surface lay effect on rough friction in roller contact
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surface lay effect on rough friction in roller contact
2004 (English)In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 257, no 12, p. 1301-1307Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Surface lay describes the direction of the predominant surface pattern. A properly designed surface texture configuration has been recognised as a vital issue affecting lubrication and sliding in machinery applications in the literature. Gaining understanding of this tribological phenomenon is no doubt beneficial in facilitating the production of more efficient machine parts and thus reduces production cost. This paper describes an experimental method to investigate the effect of surface lay on lubricated rolling/sliding of ground roller surfaces. By using the rough friction test rig, different surface lay contacts can be simulated and the friction can be measured. Friction behaviour was interpreted in terms of Stribeck curves (friction coefficient as the function of Hersey parameter [ηv/p]). Results show that an optimal contact lay angle that provides a minimum friction value is achievable through rig testing. The relative sliding speed direction has a symmetrical effect on friction at the same lay orientation; for sliding speed angles less than about 80, the larger the angle, the lower the friction, and vice versa. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2004
Keywords
Surface lay, Surface topography, Contact angle, Friction, Lubrication, Rollers (machine components), Rolling, Roughness, Sliding, Textures, Tribology
National Category
Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-3559 (URN)10.1016/j.wear.2003.09.006 (DOI)000225750700018 ()2-s2.0-10044251960 (Scopus ID)
Conference
9th International Conference on Metrology & Properties of Engineering Surfaces, Halmstad, Sweden, Sept. 10-11, 2003
Note

Funding: The Swedish Board for Vehicular Research & Volvo

Available from: 2010-01-08 Created: 2009-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved

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