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Promoting medical self-care: evaluation of a family intervention implemented in the primary health care by pharmacies
Primary Health Care Research and Development Unit, County Council Mailand, Falkenberg, Sweden.
Primary Health Care Research and Development Unit, County Council Mailand, Falkenberg, Sweden.
Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
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1999 (English)In: Family Practice, ISSN 0263-2136, E-ISSN 1460-2229, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 522-527Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Medical self-care is the range of behaviours undertaken by people to promote or restore health when dealing with a medical problem.

Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate medical self-care effects of a family intervention implemented in primary health care by pharmacies, in terms of non-professional and professional involvement.

Methods: The intervention was implemented in one of two primary health care areas during a 4-month period and involved consecutive families acting as an intervention (IG, n = 94) or a control (CG, n = 93) group. Eight telephone interviews were conducted with each family. The families were asked about complaints of illness, how long they prevailed and how they were treated.

Results: The results showed (P < 0.05–0.0001) that the IG had more medical problems (931 versus 621) compared with the CG, were less hospitalized (4 versus 10), stayed at home more to take care of sick children (84 versus 40), read more medical brochures (121 versus 31), tried more non-medical treatments (228 versus 116), and had fewer visits to the department of paediatrics but more visits to primary health care (69 and 98 versus 90 and 68).

Conclusions: Due to the non-randomization procedure, some caution with regard to generalization of the results must be taken, but they are in concordance with established knowledge of the usefulness of medical self-care. The results indicate that a brief intervention for families can change the use of health authorities. It therefore seems meaningful to implement the intervention in a more comprehensive way in the primary health care setting, while at the same time trying to implement it as a large-scale randomized experimental study, comprising aspects such as the individual's need for care, the use of the right organization level and the assessment of economic costs and savings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press , 1999. Vol. 16, no 5, p. 522-527
Keywords [en]
Evaluation, Families, Medical problems, Medical self-care, Primary health care
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-1329DOI: 10.1093/fampra/16.5.522ISI: 000083325900011PubMedID: 10533951Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0032849394Local ID: 2082/1708OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-1329DiVA, id: diva2:238547
Available from: 2008-04-16 Created: 2008-04-16 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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