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Hearing Impairment, Sense of Humour and Communication Strategies
ENT Department, St Olavs University Hospital of Trondheim, Norway.
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
Department of Neuromedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
2007 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One purpose of this study was to describe sense of humour and communication strategies in a general population of adults who needed hearing aid (HA) fitting or refitting. Another purpose was to explore the correlation between characteristics of hearing impairment (HI), sense of humour, and other participant characteristics and the communication strategies as outcome. Consecutive patients (n=343) at the Department of Audiology during 1 year completed the Sense of Humour Questionnaire-6 (SHQ-6) and the Communication Strategies Scale (CSS with maladaptive behaviour, verbal and non-verbal strategies). It was found that a high sense of humour was related to female gender and younger age. In multiple regression analyses, use of non-verbal communication strategies was more prevalent among females and increased with younger age, longer duration of HI, and previous HA experience. Use of verbal communication strategies and maladaptive communication behaviour increased with increasing HI. Use of verbal strategies was further associated with younger age and previous HA experience. Frequent use of maladaptive behaviour was related to younger age, longer duration of HI and less sense of humour. Maladaptive behaviour, alternatively expressed as negative reactions to stressful events in communication, was negatively associated with sense of humour. This study may indicate a role for sense of humour in prevention of maladaptive behaviour. It may also improve our understanding of what factors influence the use of communication strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia: Routledge, 2007. Vol. 9, no 1, p. 1-13
Keywords [en]
Hearing impairment, Communication Strategies, Humour
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-539DOI: 10.1080/15017410600687073PubMedID: 16690583Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-45849124001Local ID: 2082/880OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-539DiVA, id: diva2:237718
Available from: 2007-02-22 Created: 2007-02-22 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved

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Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.

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Citation style
  • apa
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More languages
Output format
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