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What is supportive when an adult next-of-kin is in critical care?
Department of Medicine and Care, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
2005 (English)In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 289-298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is little documented knowledge about what is supportive from the perspective of relatives with a critically ill next-of-kin in the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of the present study was to generate a theoretical understanding of what relatives experience as supportive when faced with the situation of having an adult next-of-kin admitted to critical care. The study was designed using a grounded theory methodology. Interviews were conducted with 29 adult relatives of adult ICU patients in southwest Sweden. Relatives described the need to be empowered and that support was needed to enable them to use both internal and external resources to cope with having a next-of-kin in critical care. To achieve empowerment, the relatives described the need to trust in oneself, to encounter charity and to encounter professionalism. The findings can contribute understanding and sensitivity to the situation of the relatives as well as indicating what form social support should take. It is essential that healthcare professionals understand how important it is for relatives to have control over their vulnerable situation and that they also reflect upon how they would like to be treated themselves in a similar situation. Recommendations for future practice are presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2005. Vol. 10, no 6, p. 289-298
Keywords [en]
critical care, empowerment, family, grounded theory, resources, support, psychological adaptation, adult, aged, attitude to health, critical care, empathy, female, helping behavior, humans, male, middle aged, psychological models, needs assessment, nurse's role, nursing methodology research, nursing staff, professional competence, professional-family relations, qualitative research, questionnaires, self efficacy, social support, Sweden, trust, visitors to patients
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-506DOI: 10.1111/j.1362-1017.2005.00136.xPubMedID: 16255336Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-33644669152Local ID: 2082/846OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-506DiVA, id: diva2:237685
Available from: 2007-02-09 Created: 2007-02-09 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved

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Hildingh, Cathrine

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  • apa
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  • Other locale
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