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Dynamic and steady-state responses of inorganic nitrogen pools and NH3 exchange in leaves of Lolium perenne and Bromus erectus to changes in root nitrogen supply
Plant Nutrition Laboratory, Department of Agricultural Sciences, Royal Vet. and Agricultural Univ., Frederiksberg C, Copenhagen, Denmark.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9157-7400
Plant Nutrition Laboratory, Department of Agricultural Sciences, Royal Vet. and Agricultural Univ., Thorvaldensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Copenhagen, Denmark.
2002 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 128, no 2, p. 742-750Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Short- and long-term responses of inorganic N pools and plant-atmosphere NH3 exchange to changes in external N supply were investigated in 11-week-old plants of two grass species, Lolium perenne and Bromus erectus, characteristic of N-rich and N-poor grassland ecosystems, respectively. A switch of root N source from NO3- to NH4+ caused within 3 h a 3- to 6-fold increase in leaf apoplastic NH4+ concentration and a simultaneous decrease in apoplastic pH of about 0.4 pH units in both species. The concentration of total extractable leaf tissue NH4+ also increased two to three times within 3 h after the switch. Removal of exogenous NH4+ caused the apoplastic NH4+ concentration to decline back to the original level within 24 h, whereas the leaf tissue NH4+concentration decreased more slowly and did not reach the original level in 48 h. After growing for 5 weeks with a steady-state supply of NO3- or NH4+, L. perenne were in all cases larger, contained more N, and utilized the absorbed N more efficiently for growth than B. erectus, whereas the two species behaved oppositely with respect to tissue concentrations of NO3-, NH4+, and total N. Ammonia compensation points were higher for B. erectus than for L. perenne and were in both species higher for NH4+- than for NO3--grown plants. Steady-state levels of apoplastic NH4+, tissue NH4+, and NH3 emission were significantly correlated. It is concluded that leaf apoplastic NH4+ is a highly dynamic pool, closely reflecting changes in the external N supply. This rapid response may constitute a signaling system coordinating leaf N metabolism with the actual N uptake by the roots and the external N availability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Rockville, Md.: American Society of Plant Physiologists , 2002. Vol. 128, no 2, p. 742-750
Keywords [en]
Inorganic Nitrogen Pools, Lolium perenne, Bromus erectus
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-315DOI: 10.1104/pp.010602ISI: 000173977100045PubMedID: 11842177Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0036008933Local ID: 2082/617OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-315DiVA, id: diva2:237494
Available from: 2006-12-13 Created: 2006-12-13 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved

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Mattsson, Marie

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