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Put Some Music on: The Effects of pre-Task Music Tempo on Arousal, Affective State, Perceived Exertion, and Anaerobic Performance
University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8987-5975
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2023 (English)In: Music & Science, E-ISSN 2059-2043, Vol. 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on the ergogenic effects of music on athletic performance usually includes multiple antecedents simultaneously. Consequently, this study set out to isolate a single antecedent using a highly controlled experiment. More specifically, the aim of the study was to investigate the effect of pre-task, slow- and fast-tempo music on arousal, affective state, perceived exertion, and anaerobic rowing performance by isolating music tempo as the sole intrinsic musical factor. Forty young adults (male = 23, female = 17) participated in three trials where they all were exposed to no-music, slow-tempo, and fast-tempo music conditions in a randomized order. The music was exclusively composed for this study and equally novel for all participants. It was based on the same electronic track with a techno-orientation rendered to both 110 (slow-tempo) and 140 (fast-tempo) BPM. Following music exposure, the participants were momentarily asked to report levels of felt arousal and affective state before being instructed to perform a 30-s maximal rowing test on an ergometer. Upon completion of each rowing test, subjects were then asked to report their perceived exertion. Both fast- and slow-tempo pre-task music exposure led to increased arousal and positive affective state when compared to no music. Fast-tempo music led to a significantly higher mean power output than slow-tempo music. No significant differences were found for peak watt output or rating of perceived exertion when comparing all conditions. These findings suggest that exposure to pre-task music may offer positive psychological benefits prior to commencing anaerobic sporting tasks. Results also suggest that fast-tempo music may have an ergogenic effect on anaerobic performance. © The Author(s) 2023.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2023. Vol. 6
Keywords [en]
Exercise, fast music, power output, slow music, warm up
National Category
Musicology Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Health Innovation, M4HP
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-51462DOI: 10.1177/20592043231174388Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85160761982OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-51462DiVA, id: diva2:1794379
Available from: 2023-09-05 Created: 2023-09-05 Last updated: 2024-04-19Bibliographically approved

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Ivarsson, Andreas

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