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A Broad View on Robot Self-Defense: Rapid Scoping Review and Cultural Comparison
Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. teraction Science Laboratories (ISL), Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (ATR), Kyoto, Japa.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4998-1685
teraction Science Laboratories (ISL), Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (ATR), Kyoto, Japa.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4338-801X
Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5100-6435
Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. stitute of Applied Informatics and Formal Description Methods (AIFB), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe, Germany.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4894-4134
2023 (English)In: Robotics, E-ISSN 2218-6581, Vol. 12, no 2, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With power comes responsibility: as robots become more advanced and prevalent, the role they will play in human society becomes increasingly important. Given that violence is an important problem, the question emerges if robots could defend people, even if doing so might cause harm to someone. The current study explores the broad context of how people perceive the acceptability of such robot self-defense (RSD) in terms of (1) theory, via a rapid scoping review, and (2) public opinion in two countries. As a result, we summarize and discuss: increasing usage of robots capable of wielding force by law enforcement and military, negativity toward robots, ethics and legal questions (including differences to the well-known trolley problem), control in the presence of potential failures, and practical capabilities that such robots might require. Furthermore, a survey was conducted, indicating that participants accepted the idea of RSD, with some cultural differences. We believe that, while substantial obstacles will need to be overcome to realize RSD, society stands to gain from exploring its possibilities over the longer term, toward supporting human well-being in difficult times. © 2023 by the authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, 2023. Vol. 12, no 2, article id 43
Keywords [en]
dark side of human–robot interaction (HRI), robot crime, robot ethics, robot self-defense, robot violence, technological acceptance
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-51234DOI: 10.3390/robotics12020043ISI: 000983119800001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85153767580OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-51234DiVA, id: diva2:1781097
Available from: 2023-07-07 Created: 2023-07-07 Last updated: 2023-07-07Bibliographically approved

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Cooney, MartinKochenborger Duarte, EduardoVinel, Alexey

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