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Wave-like Patterns of Plant Phenology Determine Ungulate Movement Tactics
Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, United States.
Center for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Bioscience, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, United States.
Department of Biodiversity and Molecular Ecology, Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, San Michele all'Adige, Italy.
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Number of Authors: 362020 (English)In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 30, no 17, p. 3444-3449Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Animals exhibit a diversity of movement tactics [1]. Tracking resources that change across space and time is predicted to be a fundamental driver of animal movement [2]. For example, some migratory ungulates (i.e., hooved mammals) closely track the progression of highly nutritious plant green-up, a phenomenon called "green-wave surfing" [3-5]. Yet general principles describing how the dynamic nature of resources determine movement tactics are lacking [6]. We tested an emerging theory that predicts surfing and the existence of migratory behavior will be favored in environments where green-up is fleeting and moves sequentially across large landscapes (i.e., wave-like green-up) [7]. Landscapes exhibiting wave-like patterns of green-up facilitated surfing and explained the existence of migratory behavior across 61 populations of four ungulate species on two continents (n = 1,696 individuals). At the species level, foraging benefits were equivalent between tactics, suggesting that each movement tactic is fine-tuned to local patterns of plant phenology. For decades, ecologists have sought to understand how animals move to select habitat, commonly defining habitat as a set of static patches [8, 9]. Our findings indicate that animal movement tactics emerge as a function of the flux of resources across space and time, underscoring the need to redefine habitat to include its dynamic attributes. As global habitats continue to be modified by anthropogenic disturbance and climate change [10], our synthesis provides a generalizable framework to understand how animal movement will be influenced by altered patterns of resource phenology.© 2020 Elsevier Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cell Press , 2020. Vol. 30, no 17, p. 3444-3449
Keywords [en]
Capreolus capreolus, Cervus canadensis, Cervus elaphus, Odocoileus hemionus, green wave, migration, residency, resource landscape, resource tracking
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Ecology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-43293DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2020.06.032ISI: 000569894000007PubMedID: 32619482Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85087935553OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-43293DiVA, id: diva2:1486781
Available from: 2020-11-03 Created: 2020-11-03 Last updated: 2022-07-06Bibliographically approved

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Jarnemo, Anders

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