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Gastrostomy tube insertion in children with developmental or acquired disorders: a register-based study
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Regional Habilitation Center, Region Halland, Kungsbacka, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5499-7246
Orofacial Resource Centre for Rare Diseases, Public Dental Service, Mun-H-Center, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Health and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9551-8686
2020 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 62, no 10, p. 1191-1197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe trends in gastrostomy tube insertion in children with developmental or acquired disorders in Sweden and assess their demographic characteristics. Method: Children aged 0 to 18 years with gastrostomy tube insertions recorded between 1998 and 2014 were identified in the Swedish National Patient Register. Associations between disorder type and year of surgery, as well as age at surgery, were analysed using linear regression analyses. The association between disorder type and mortality 2 years from gastrostomy tube insertion was also analysed using logistic regression analysis. Results: The data for 4112 children (2182 males, 1930 females), with a median age of 2 years (interquartile range=1–8y), were analysed. Children who presented with developmental disorders were the largest group (n=3501, 85%). The most common diagnosis in children with developmental disorders was cerebral palsy (n=165, 4%). In children with acquired disorders, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (n=117, 3%) was the most common diagnosis. Gastrostomy tube insertions increased from 1998 to 2014, with the greatest increase in children with developmental disorders, who were younger than children with acquired disorders when the gastrostomy tube was first inserted. Age at tube insertion decreased in both groups during the study period. Mortality was higher in children with acquired disorders, suggesting that gastrostomy tube insertion should be part of a palliative care approach. Interpretation: Child characteristics differed depending on whether the underlying disorder was developmental or acquired, suggesting a need for clinical health care guidelines related to the specific goals of gastrostomy tube insertion. What this paper adds: Gastrostomy tube insertions increased by 140% from 1998 to 2014 in Sweden. The age of children with developmental disorders decreased by 1 month per year during the study period. Children presenting with developmental disorders were younger than children with acquired disorders when the gastrostomy tube was first inserted. Mortality was higher in children with acquired disorders. © 2020 The Authors. DevelopmentalMedicine & Child Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Mac Keith Press

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2020. Vol. 62, no 10, p. 1191-1197
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-43100DOI: 10.1111/dmcn.14634ISI: 000550852900001PubMedID: 32697341Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85088295196OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-43100DiVA, id: diva2:1467271
Note

Funding sponsor: Region Halland

Available from: 2020-09-15 Created: 2020-09-15 Last updated: 2021-10-25Bibliographically approved

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Backman, Ellen

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