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Health promotion: The impact of beliefs of health benefits, social relations and enjoyment on exercise continuation
Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2854-7182
Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5177-8002
Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
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2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 24, no Suppl. 1, p. 66-75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to explore how and why participants in structured exercise intervention programs continue or stop exercising after the program is finished. We conducted four focus group interviews with four groups of middle-aged and elderly men (total n=28) who had participated in exercise interventions involving playing either a team sport (football) or a more individually focused activity (spinning and crossfit). Our results show that different social, organizational and material structures inherent in the different activities shape the subjects' enjoyment of exercise participation, as well as their intention and ability to continue being active. In conclusion, team sport activities seem to be intrinsically motivating to the participants through positive social interaction and play. They are therefore more likely to result in exercise continuation than activities that rely primarily on extrinsic motivation such as the expectation of improved health and well-being. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2014. Vol. 24, no Suppl. 1, p. 66-75
Keywords [en]
Elderly, focus groups, soccer, middle aged, spinning, crossfit
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41883DOI: 10.1111/sms.12275ISI: 000337640300009PubMedID: 24944133Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84902584000OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-41883DiVA, id: diva2:1423508
Note

Funding: Nordea-fonden, Denmark

Available from: 2020-04-14 Created: 2020-04-14 Last updated: 2020-04-22

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Wikman, Johan Michael

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