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Muscle activity during low-speed rear impact
Liberty Safe Work Research Centre, Department of Environmental & Occupational Medicine, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom & AventaMed, Rubicon Centre, Cork, Ireland, United Kingdom.
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
Department of Health & Physical Education, The Education University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
Educ Univ Hong Kong, Dept Hlth & Phys Educ, Tai Po, 10 Lo Ping Rd, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
2019 (English)In: Chinese Journal of Traumatology, ISSN 1008-1275, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 80-84Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Whiplash associated disorders remain a major health problem in terms of impact on health care and on societal costs. Aetiology remains controversial including the old supposition that the cervical muscles do not play a significant role. This study examined the muscle activity from relevant muscles during rear-end impacts in an effort to gauge their influence on the aetiology of whiplash associated disorders.

Methods: Volunteers were subjected to a sub-injury level of rear impact. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record cervical muscle activity before, during and after impact. Muscle response time and EMG signal amplitude were analysed. Head, pelvis, and T1 acceleration data were recorded. Results: The activities of the cervical muscles were found to be significant. The sternocleidomastoideus, trapezius and erector spinae were activated on average 59 ms, 73 ms and 84 ms after the impact stimulus, respectively, prior to peak head acceleration (113 ms).

Conclusion: The cervical muscles reacted prior to peak head acceleration, thus in time to influence whiplash biomechanics and possibly injury mechanisms. It is recommended therefore, that muscular influences be incorporated into the development of the new rear-impact crash test dummy in order to make the dummy as biofidelic as possible. ©2019 Chinese Medical Association. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chongching: Zhonghua Changshang Zazhi Bianjibu , 2019. Vol. 22, no 2, p. 80-84
Keywords [en]
Electromyography, Neck muscles, Whiplash, Impact, Sled, Crash dummies
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41458DOI: 10.1016/j.cjtee.2018.10.006ISI: 000465545400004PubMedID: 30962127Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85063761111OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-41458DiVA, id: diva2:1390217
Available from: 2020-01-31 Created: 2020-01-31 Last updated: 2020-02-06Bibliographically approved

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Magnusson, Marianne L.

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