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FISHERY RELATED INJURIES TO CETACEANS OFF THE NORWEGIAN COAST
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

The fishing industry is a very important source of food and will be also used in the future. Therefore it is essential to study the impact of fishery on marine mammals. Whales (cetaceans) interact with fishing vessels because the catch is easy prey for them. Cetaceans are caught everyday as bycatch and often get entangled in fishing gear. The result could be starvation, drowning or infection of the cetacean. This study focused on injuries on dorsal fins on orcas occurring in Norwegian waters. In Norway, Tiu Similä, Sanna Kuningas and Norwegian Orca Survey have taken pictures and matched these to an ID-catalogue of orcas. This ID-catalogue was used in this study. 842 pictures of individuals were categorized by the size of the injury on the dorsal fin and the location of the nicks. Percent of total amount of injured males and females/subadults was estimated. Females and subadults were grouped together because of the difficulties of distinguishing the subadults from the females. 34% of the females/subadults and 54% of the males had nicks on their dorsal fins. The amount of damaged fins was 2% in females/subadults and 4% in males. This result was expected as my theory was that orca males swim closer to fishing boats, than females/subadults do. The most common location of the nicks was the upper hind part. It might be because that is the thinnest part of the dorsal fin.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36469OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-36469DiVA, id: diva2:1191646
External cooperation
Tiu Similä; Eve Jourdain
Subject / course
Biology
Educational program
Conservation and Diversity, 180 credits
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-19 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf