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Athletes’ relationship crises: Case examples and resolution strategies
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6198-0784
2017 (English)In: Conference Abstracts: 32nd Annual Conference AASP2017, Orlando, FL, October 18-21, Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2017, p. 130-130Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A body of knowledge exists in sport psychology about the dynamic social context of athletes’ development and the roles of the people involved (Jowett & Lavallee, 2007; Jowett & Poczwardowski, 2006). In many senses, other people (coaches, managers, parents, peers, opponents, sport psychology practitioners, etc.) make athletes’ careers possible and meaningful (Jowett, 2003; Stambulova, 2010). Therefore, harmonious relationships are key pre-conditions for successful careers, whereas problematic relationships often lead to deterioration in athletes’ well-being, performance, and non-sport life (Sandström, Linnér, & Stambulova, 2016). In this presentation athletes’ problematic relationships will be analyzed from a career transition perspective that is as crisis phases in their careers that athletes can’t cope with on their own and need proper interventions. One educational tool that can be used in working with athletes experiencing relationship crises is the mobilization model of counseling in crisis-transitions (Stambulova, 2011) that is aimed at helping the clients to analyze crisis situations, find possible ways to cope, and further develop their social and other coping skills. In this presentation a real case involving a young talented female swimmer who could not balance contrasting expectations of her coach, parents, and her boyfriend in term of her athletic role, and consequently experienced frustration and disharmony in the relationships with all of them will be shared and analyzed using the mobilization model. The analysis will follow six steps, including: (1) collecting and sorting out the client’s information, (2) identifying, prioritizing and articulating the problem issues, (3) analyzing the current status of the client’s coping resources and barriers, (4) discussing the transition alternatives and stimulating the client to make the strategic decision, (5) goal setting and planning relevant to the decision made, and (6) concluding and providing follow-ups. © 2017 by the Association for Applied Sport Psychology 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2017. p. 130-130
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35833ISBN: 978-0-9855310-6-5 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-35833DiVA, id: diva2:1165477
Conference
The 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP), October 18-21, 2017, Orlando, FL, USA
Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2018-01-29Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf