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Applying ACT in the context of elite sports: a reflection on blurred lines between clinical issues and performance enhancement
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6500-182x
2017 (English)In: Sport Psychology: Linking theory to practice / [ed] Gangyan, S., Cruz, J., & Jaenes, J. C., 2017, p. 186-186Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Being an athlete at international level is primarily about performance accomplishments, and sport psychology has traditionally focused on performance enhancement and clinical issues has received limited attention. However, mental health is becoming a greater concern in the context of elite sports (Baltzell, 2016; Gardner & Moore, 2006). Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT) is regarded as the third wave of Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in clinical psychology (Hayes, 2004). Interestingly, ACT is becoming increasingly applied to the context of sports (Baltzell, 2016; Gardner & Moore, 2006). Basically, brief interventions of ACT can conceptually be described by three core pillars represented by open, aware and engaged (Strosahl, Robinson, & Gustavsson, 2012). Open is about the ability to accept uncomfortable sensations and distress without resistance and struggle. Consequently, when open, behaviour is shaped by direct results rather than rigid rules. Awareness is essentially the ability to experience the present moment and to take perspective on self and the story about self. Finally, engaged is the behaviour oriented dimension and is expressed by strong connection with values and the ability to sustain value-consistent actions. Moreover, value driven recovery behaviours may potentially enhance health and performance. Committed actions are specific behaviours that arise as “reflections” based upon values. Ultimately, athletes should be able to stay connected to valued driven behaviours, on purpose, in the present moment, and do it with full acceptance. This presentation will address sport psychology consultants who work across the blurred lines between performance enhancement and clinical issues with elite athletes with ACT-based interventions at the Olympics. Finally, the presentation will discuss some future directions with emphasise on preventive ACT-interventions applied to the elite sports.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. p. 186-186
Keyword [en]
Olympics, mindfulness, consulting, sport psychology services, elite sport
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35419ISBN: 978-84-9148-282-6 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-35419DiVA: diva2:1157084
Conference
ISSP 14th World Congress, Sevilla, Spain, July 10-14, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-15 Created: 2017-11-15 Last updated: 2018-02-20Bibliographically approved

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Moesch, Karin

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Citation style
  • apa
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