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Mesopredator behavioral response to olfactory signals of an apex predator
Grimsö Wildlife Research Station, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Riddarhyttan, Sweden; Mammal Research Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, Białowieża, Poland.
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3174-8604
Halmstad University.
Mammal Research Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, Waszkiewicza 1, Białowieża, Poland.
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2017 (English)In: Journal of ethology, ISSN 0289-0771, E-ISSN 1439-5444, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 161-168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Olfactory signals constitute an important mechanism in interspecific interactions, but little is known regarding their role in communication between predator species. We analyzed the behavioral responses of a mesopredator, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), to an olfactory cue (scat) of an apex predator, the lynx (Lynx lynx) in BiałowieÅŒa Primeval Forest, Poland, using video camera traps. Red fox visited sites with scats more often than expected and the duration of their visits was longer at scat sites than at control sites (no scat added). Vigilant behavior, sniffing and scent marking (including over-marking) occurred more often at scat sites compared to control sites, where foxes mainly passed by. Vigilance was most pronounced during the first days of the recordings. Red fox behavior was also influenced by foxes previously visiting scat sites. They sniffed and scent marked (multiple over-marking) more frequently when the lynx scat had been over-marked previously by red fox. Fox visits to lynx scats may be seen as a trade-off between obtaining information on a potential food source (prey killed by lynx) and the potential risk of predation by an apex predator. © 2017, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tokyo: Springer-Verlag Tokyo Inc., 2017. Vol. 35, no 2, p. 161-168
Keyword [en]
Interspecific interactions, Lynx lynx, Over-marking, Predator detection, Scent marking, Vulpes vulpes
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35380DOI: 10.1007/s10164-016-0504-6ISI: 000400078900002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85009177489OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-35380DiVA: diva2:1156924
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 245737
Available from: 2017-11-14 Created: 2017-11-14 Last updated: 2017-11-14Bibliographically approved

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Jarnemo, Anders

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