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Development of a clinical sport projective assessment method: the Athlete Apperception Technique (AAT)
Private Practice, Melbourne, Australia.
Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
2017 (English)In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 33-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Within the field of applied sport psychology, there is an increasing appreciation for diversity of training models, research methodologies, and therapeutic approaches. For example, psychodynamic formulations and interpretations have begun to appear more frequently in the sport psychology literature. In keeping with emerging psychodynamic viewpoints, we believe the time is right to introduce a qualitative sport-specific projective instrument: the Athlete Apperception Technique (AAT). The AAT represents a new technique based on psychodynamic theory and established projective test construction principles. It was designed primarily as a clinical tool for practitioners and not as an instrument for quantitative research into personality. It does, however, have potential research applications, especially in clinical sport case study research and narrative analysis investigations. The AAT produces an idiographic understanding of athletes’ characteristics, anxieties, and motivations (both conscious and unconscious). We briefly review the literature on the development of projective techniques, explain the rationale underlying the development of the AAT, and present three sequential studies to explain the AAT image selection procedures that led to the final product. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2017. Vol. 9, no 1, p. 33-48
Keyword [en]
Psychodymanic theory, projective tests, images, applied sport psychology, narratives
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35217DOI: 10.1080/2159676X.2016.1180637ISI: 000391387600004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84965082738OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-35217DiVA: diva2:1150113
Available from: 2017-10-18 Created: 2017-10-18 Last updated: 2017-10-24Bibliographically approved

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Andersen, Mark

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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