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“The individual at the centre” – a grounded theory explaining how sport clubs retain young adults
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8345-8994
Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no 1, 1361782Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: There is still a lack of knowledge regarding which social processes occur in sport clubs and what factors influence young adults to want to remain in a sport club context. Thus, the purpose of this study was to construct a grounded theory (GT) explaining how sport clubs can retain their young adults.

Method: The study uses an intersectional approach. In line with constructivist GT methodology, data from 14 focus-group interviews (27 coaches and 28 young adults) were collected and analysed using a constant comparative method.

Results: The core category, “The individual at the centre of a community”, summarizes a process, whereby the generated GT contains three main categories, namely (1) “Participation and influence”, (2) “Social connectedness” and (3) “Good conditions”.

Conclusions: The coaches put the individual at the centre of a community and pay attention to the needs and interests of all the young adults, regardless of their background, ambitions, and skills. However, while the idea of a moral imperative to provide for diversity was not directly absent in the discussions with both the coaches and young adults, most of the diversity approaches seemed to be based on ambition and skills, gender, age and sexuality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxfordshire: Taylor & Francis, 2017. Vol. 12, no 1, 1361782
Keyword [en]
grounded theory, intersectionality, participation, social connectedness, young adults
National Category
Social Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35136DOI: 10.1080/17482631.2017.1361782ISI: 000408682200001PubMedID: 28853323OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-35136DiVA: diva2:1146715
Available from: 2017-10-03 Created: 2017-10-03 Last updated: 2017-10-09Bibliographically approved

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Lindgren, Eva-Carin

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