hh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Prevalence and socioeconomic characteristics of alcohol disorders among men and women in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa
University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3833-851X
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4773-1447
Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa.
2017 (English)In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

There is growing concern about alcohol problems in low- and middle-income countries. More research is required, particularly among the younger generation. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of alcohol disorders and associated socioeconomic characteristics among young men and women living in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. This was a cross-sectional population-based study of 977 participants (52% male and 48% female) aged 18–40, the majority of whom lived in low-income areas. Data collection was carried out in 2012 by trained fieldworkers. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (DSM-IV) was used to investigate the prevalence of alcohol dependence (increased tolerance to alcohol, failed attempt to cut down, risk of physical and mental effects) and alcohol abuse (harmful use, consistent intoxication, risk behaviour, physically hazardous, social problems). A high 12-month prevalence of alcohol dependence was found (26.5% in total; 39.0% among men and 19.1% among women) as well as of alcohol abuse (9% in total; 19.0% among men and 6.0% among women). Few socioeconomic differences emerged among the men, except older men (OR 1.94, CI 1.11–3.42) and those supported by social grants (OR 2.28, CI 1.06–4.93), who presented higher odd ratios for alcohol dependence than the reference groups. Among the women, more differences emerged: women who were widowed/single (OR 2.35, CI 1.20–4.62), had no education (OR 3.41, CI 1.04–11.21), had a low income (OR 3.26, CI 1.55–6.80) and had no social support from friends when ill presented higher odd ratios (OR 1.73, CI 1.07–2.80). In the adjusted model, marital status and low income remained statistically significant. With regard to alcohol abuse, fewer socioeconomic differences emerged. Interventions need to address the early onset of alcohol misuse in order to meet both current needs and long-standing mental and physical illness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2017.
Keyword [en]
alcohol abuse, community mental health, nursing, poverty and health, social work and health, young people
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34875DOI: 10.1111/hsc.12487PubMedID: 28868804OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-34875DiVA: diva2:1138329
Projects
Barriers to health care and the right to health for persons with mental illness in SA: How can access and right to health be improved?
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, SWE-2010-226
Available from: 2017-09-04 Created: 2017-09-04 Last updated: 2017-09-07

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Andersson, LenaNyman, Carin
By organisation
Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI)
In the same journal
Health & Social Care in the Community
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 30 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf