hh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Signs of aphasia: Online identity and stigma management in post-stroke aphasia
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0826-4735
Göteborgs Universitet.
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
2017 (English)In: Cyberpsychology : Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, ISSN 1802-7962, E-ISSN 1802-7962, Vol. 11, no 1, 10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to investigate online strategies for re-negotiating identity, in terms of stigma management, developed by working-age Swedish Internet users with post-stroke aphasia, i.e., acquired language impairment caused by brain injury. Interviews were conducted with nine individuals (aged 26-61, three men and six women) with post-stroke aphasia. In addition, a total of 1,581 screenshots of online posts (e.g., photos, videos, text, emoticons) created by the same participants were collected. Drawing on social semiotics (specifically the three dimensions of online communication mentioned by Kress (2003), i.e., composition, content and context) and Goffman’s theory of stigma (1963, specifically the concepts of stigma management and passing), qualitative thematic analysis was performed. Regarding composition, three themes emerged: Relying on others or technology, Beyond speaking and writing, and Controlling speed and timing. The participants rarely posted content about aphasia, but some of them used the Internet to raise awareness. Different online contexts had different meaning to the participants in terms of identity. Being open about the aphasia in one forum did not imply the same behaviour in another forum (e.g., dating sites). For the participants to pass (Goffman, 1963), should they want to, they needed to control all three dimensions. If the context or the composition revealed the stigma, controlling the content was not enough to pass. The multimodality of the Internet enabled the participants to manage their stigma in a variety of ways and to choose whether to be perceived as persons with aphasia or not.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 11, no 1, 10
Keyword [en]
aphasia, identity, stigma, online communication, disability
Keyword [sv]
afasi, identitet, stigma, digitalt medierad kommunikation, funktionshinder
National Category
Communication Studies Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34010DOI: 10.5817/CP2017-1-10OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-34010DiVA: diva2:1111629
Available from: 2017-06-19 Created: 2017-06-19 Last updated: 2017-06-20

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textCyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Taubner, HelenaHallén, Malin
By organisation
The Wigforss GroupSchool of Health and Welfare
In the same journal
Cyberpsychology : Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace
Communication StudiesSocial Sciences InterdisciplinaryOther Social Sciences not elsewhere specified

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 9 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf