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A longitudinal study of the frequency of knee pain and the effect on countermovement jump at a sports secondary school
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Background: Studies have shown that participation in sports during adolescence has several positive aspects, both physical and mentally. Today there is more focus on competition than before and more adolescents choose to specialize in one sport. High sport specialization can cause a higher risk of injuries. Knees are one of the most common sites for adolescence to experience pain in and girls are more often exposed to this problem, compared to boys.

Aim: The aim of the study was to longitudinally investigate the frequency of reported knee pain in 7th grade and 9th grade in a secondary school with a sports profile stratified for sex, difference in frequency of knee pain between 7th and 9th grade and whether knee pain affected performance in countermovement jump with arm swing.

Methods: To compare frequency of knee pain between 7th and 9th grade, the test subjects (n=42, 17 girls and 25 boys) that answered the questionnaire about knee pain both years were included. The questionnaire had six options for frequency, where those who reported “never” or “rarely” were grouped as “no knee pain”. Those who reported “monthly”, “weekly”, “more than once a week” or “almost daily” were grouped as “knee pain”. Jump height was measured by countermovement jump with arm swing. The tests were performed twice, in May 2014 when the test subjects were in 7th grade (age: mean (SD) 14±0.2) and in May 2016 in 9th grade (age: 16±0.2).

Results: In 7th grade, 74% reported knee pain (girls 82 %, boys 68%). In 9th grade, 36% reported knee pain (girls 36%, boys 35%). The difference between the frequency of knee pain in 7th and 9th grade was significant, with a lower frequency in 9th grade. In 7th grade the jump height for those with knee pain was 32.9±7.5 cm, and for those with no knee pain 33.8±5.6 cm. In 9th grade the jump height for those with knee pain was 33.5±7.2 cm, and for those with no knee pain 36.5±10.1 cm.

Conclusion: The frequency of knee pain decreased significant from 7th to 9th grade. There was no significant difference regarding jump height in countermovement jump with arm swing between the group that reported monthly to almost daily knee pain, and the group that reported that they experienced knee pain rarely or never. The result of this study therefore indicates that self-reported knee pain does not affect jumping performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , 28 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-33937OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-33937DiVA: diva2:1103937
Subject / course
Biomedicine Targeting Physical Education
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-06-01 Created: 2017-05-31 Last updated: 2017-06-28Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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