hh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Longitudinal associations between athletes’ controlled motivation, ill-being, and perceptions of controlling coach behaviors: A Bayesian latent growth curve approach
Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, Australia.
Department of Psychology & Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
2017 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 30, 205-214 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although many scholars have argued that leadership is a dynamic process jointly produced by leaders and followers, leadership in sports is most often researched as a unidirectional process from coaches to athletes. Within self-determination theory (SDT), individual characteristics are suggested to influence how people perceive external events such as coaches' behaviors. In the present study, we examined this jointly produced leadership process by investigating longitudinal associations between athletes' controlled motivation, ill-being, and perceptions of coaches' controlling behaviors at the between- and within-person levels. The participants were 247 young elite skiers enrolled at Swedish sport high schools who responded to self-report questionnaires at three time points over the course of an athletic season. At the between-person level, increases in perceptions of coaches' controlling behaviors over the season positively predicted controlled motivation at the end of the season, and controlled motivation at the beginning of the season positively predicted ill-being at the end of the season. At the within-person level, athletes' controlled motivation positively predicted perceptions of coaches’ controlling behaviors. The results at the between-person level support the unidirectional perspective and the tenets of SDT. The results at the within-person level suggest that individual characteristics such as motivation can influence how athletes perceive external events, which has been proposed theoretically but seldom examined empirically. Three plausible explanations for this reversed association are presented in the discussion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 30, 205-214 p.
Keyword [en]
Bayesian estimation, Depression/anxiety, Growth models, Interpersonal control, Leadership, Sports
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-33548DOI: 10.1016/j.psychsport.2017.03.002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-33548DiVA: diva2:1081349
Note

Andreas Stenling was supported by grants from Umeå School of Sport Sciences and the Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports (CIF), grant numbers P2014-0043 and P2015-0114.

Available from: 2017-03-13 Created: 2017-03-13 Last updated: 2017-05-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ivarsson, AndreasLindwall, Magnus
By organisation
Health and Sport
In the same journal
Psychology of Sport And Exercise
Applied Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 18 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf