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The use and abuse of 3D-printing from a business model perspective
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4702-0626
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8058-1252
2016 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The paper analyses changes in user activities and behaviour across different types of actors following the introduction of 3D printers. 3D printing, or additive manufacturing, has been claimed to disrupt manufacturing, allowing firms to move from prototyping to full-scale end-part production and replacement part production in a one-step process. 3D printing has many different uses, for example, the manufacturing of toys, shoes, lamps and fashion accessories, and by implication many different types of users and buyers. There are few empirical studies on the types of uses and users of 3D, hampering our understanding in what ways the 3D printers may change the behaviour of users, and whether 3D printers affect the likelihood and the nature of entrepreneurship or business model innovation. To investigate this, a model was created based on the 3DP literature. The model is applied on a distributor customer database and four interview-based illustrative case studies. The empirical findings show that the use of 3DP a) lowers the knowledge and resource barriers for experimentation and entrepreneurial entry, b) increases product and concept prototyping in product development, c) provides a potential for business model innovation by expanding the boundaries of the firm upstream and downstream, and d) becomes a ticket for entrepreneurial entry. Based on our results, the paper suggests that the potential of 3D printers alter user innovative activities is high but most of the potential is latent.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified Mechanical Engineering Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-32704OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-32704DiVA: diva2:1056535
Conference
Australian Center for Entrepreneurship Exchange (ACERE) Conference 2016, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia, 2-5 February, 2016
Available from: 2016-12-15 Created: 2016-12-15 Last updated: 2017-01-02Bibliographically approved

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Barth, HenrikHolmén, MagnusRosén, Bengt-Göran
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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