hh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Man-made lakes form species-rich dragonfly communities in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest (Odonata)
Ecologia e Sensoriamento Remoto, Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado-RS, Brasil.
Ecologia e Sensoriamento Remoto, Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado-RS, Brasil.
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
2016 (English)In: Odonatologica, ISSN 0375-0183, Vol. 45, no 3-4, 135-154 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One of the forest types occurring in Southern Brazil is the Mixed Ombrophilous Forest (MOF), a subtype of the Atlantic Forest and one of the biodiversity hotspots on Earth. We sampled adult Odonata at 30 locations in the Floresta Nacional de São Francisco de Paula (FLONA-SFP), Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, a national reserve which is divided into several sectors of MOF, planted Araucaria angustifolia, Pinus elliottii used for sustainable and financial purposes, and open fields. There are three types of aquatic environments in the reserve: lakes, swamps, and rivers/streams. Our aim was to obtain an overview of the species’ distribution patterns in the three types of aquatic environments and to evaluate the species occurring in lakes, an exclusively man-made habitat in this area. We recorded 46 species from seven odonate families; 25 species (x = 5.71 ± 1.77 SD) occurring in rivers/ streams, 24 in lakes (11.57 ± 2.15) and 21 in swamps (5.22 ± 3.60). Using Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling (NmDS), we showed that the species composition differed clearly between the three types of aquatic habitats. While swamps and rivers/streams had a relatively similar and uniform species composition, species in the lakes were more varied but the total species number was almost as high as that of the rivers/streams. The lake communities also differed distinctly from those of the other habitats, and we assume that the lake species originate from other degraded areas in the vicinity, indicating that the remains of the Atlantic Forest has already been strongly altered by humans. Given the poor knowledge of the Odonata in the Atlantic Forest/MOF, we hope that our study may increase the understanding of the communities, and contribute to the development of conservation measures for this fragmented biome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bergen: Societas Internationalis Odonatologica / International Odonatological Foundation , 2016. Vol. 45, no 3-4, 135-154 p.
Keyword [en]
Dragonfly, South America, Neotropics, Rio Grande do Sul, species assemblages, habitat integrity, conservation
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-32555DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.163441ISI: 000389687200001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-32555DiVA: diva2:1051215
Available from: 2016-12-01 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2017-01-09Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sahlén, Göran
By organisation
The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS)
In the same journal
Odonatologica
Ecology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 92 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf