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Smoking at onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its effect on disease activity and functional status: Experiences from BARFOT, a long-term observational study on early RA
Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Rheumatology Hospital, Oskarström, Sweden.
Department of Orthopaedics, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Rheumatology Hospital, Oskarström, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6294-538X
Department of Rheumatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
2011 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 40, no 4, 249-255 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of smoking on disease outcome in a large cohort of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

METHODS: Between 1996 and 2004, 1787 adult patients (disease duration ≤ 1 year) were included in the BARFOT early RA study in Sweden. Smoking status was recorded at inclusion in the study. Disease Activity Score using 28 joint counts (DAS28), C-reactive protein (CRP), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score, rheumatoid factor (RF), antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP), general health (GH) and pain visual analogue scales (VAS), and drug treatment were registered at inclusion and at follow-up at 3, 6, and 12 months. European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response and remission criteria were applied at 3, 6, and 12 months.

RESULTS: The proportion of patients who smoked at inclusion in the study fell from 29% in 1996 to 20% in 2004. There were no significant differences in disease activity at inclusion stratified according to smoking status. At 12 months of follow-up, 18% of current smokers at inclusion, 12% of previous smokers, and 11% of never smokers had high disease activity (DAS28 > 5.1, p = 0.005). Significantly fewer current smokers were in remission at 12 months (33%) compared to never smokers (36%) and previous smokers (42%) (p = 0.013). Current smoking at inclusion independently predicted poor EULAR response up to 12 months of follow-up.

CONCLUSION: The present study gives some support to earlier data indicating that RA patients who smoke have a more active disease but further studies are needed to confirm this.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Taylor & Francis, 2011. Vol. 40, no 4, 249-255 p.
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-32305DOI: 10.3109/03009742.2010.541495ISI: 000294068000001PubMedID: 21338325Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-80051960880OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-32305DiVA: diva2:1039956
Available from: 2016-10-25 Created: 2016-10-25 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

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