hh.sePublikasjoner
Endre søk
RefereraExporteraLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Climate Change and Everyday Life: Repertoires children use to negotiate a socio-scientific issue
Southampton Education School, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom.
Faculty of Education and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
Faculty of Education and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.ORCID-id: 0000-0002-7643-1355
Southampton Education School, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom.
2014 (engelsk)Inngår i: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 36, nr 9, s. 1491-1509Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

There are only a few studies about how primary school students engage in socio-scientific discussions. This study aims to add to this field of research by focusing on how 9–10-year-olds in Sweden and England handle climate change as a complex environmental socio-scientific issue (SSI), within the context of their own lives and in relation to society at large. It focuses on how different interpretative repertoires were used by the students in discussions to legitimise or question their everyday lifestyles. They discussed four possible options that a government might consider to help reduce carbon dioxide production. Six main repertoires were identified: Everyday life, Self-Interest, Environment, Science and Technology, Society and Justice. The Everyday life repertoire was used when students related their discussion to their everyday lifestyles. Science and technology-related solutions were offered to maintain or improve things, but these were sometimes rather unrealistic. Arguments related to environment and health frequently appeared to have a superior status compared to the others. Findings also highlighted how conflicts between the students were actually productive by bringing in several perspectives to negotiate the solutions. These primary school students were, therefore, able to discuss and negotiate a complex real-world SSI. Students positioned themselves as active contributors to society, using their life experiences and limited knowledge to understand the problems that affected their everyday lives. Honing these skills within a school science community of practice could facilitate primary students' engagement with SSIs and empower them as citizens. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2014. Vol. 36, nr 9, s. 1491-1509
Emneord [en]
Primary school, Global warming, Discursive repertoires
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-28209DOI: 10.1080/09500693.2014.891159ISI: 000335862200006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84900466748OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-28209DiVA, id: diva2:810225
Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-05-06 Laget: 2015-05-06 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-04bibliografisk kontrollert

Open Access i DiVA

Fulltekst mangler i DiVA

Andre lenker

Forlagets fulltekstScopus

Personposter BETA

Malmberg, Claes

Søk i DiVA

Av forfatter/redaktør
Malmberg, Claes
I samme tidsskrift
International Journal of Science Education

Søk utenfor DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric

doi
urn-nbn
Totalt: 131 treff
RefereraExporteraLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf