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Recognition of Similarities: A Methodological Approach to Analysing and Characterising Patterns of Daily Occupations
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5865-2632
Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5163-2997
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0136-3079
2004 (English)In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 3-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It has been proposed that it should be possible to identify patterns if daily occupations that promote health or cause illness. This study aimed to develop and to evaluate a process for analysing and characterising subjectively perceived patterns of daily occupations, by describing patterns as consisting if main, hidden, and unexpected occupations. Yesterday diaries describing one day if 100 working married mothers were collected through interviews. The diaries were transformed into time-and-occupation graphs. An analysis based on visual interpretation of the patterns was performed. The graphs were grouped into the categories low, medium, or high complexity. In order to identify similarities the graphs were then compared both pair-wise and group-wise. Finally, the complexity and similarities perspectives were integrated, identifying the most typical patterns of daily occupations representing low, medium, and high complexity. Visual differences in complexity were evident. In order to validate the Recognition of Similarities (ROS) process developed, a measure expressing the probability if change was computed. This probability was found to differ statistically significantly between the three groups, supporting the validity of the ROS process. © 2004, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Melbourne: Taylor & Francis, 2004. Vol. 11, no 1, p. 3-13
Keywords [en]
Pattern of occupation, Methodology, Occupational therapy
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-227DOI: 10.1080/14427591.2004.9686526Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85009637010Local ID: 2082/522OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-227DiVA, id: diva2:237405
Available from: 2006-11-24 Created: 2006-11-24 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved

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Erlandsson, Lena-KarinRögnvaldsson, Thorsteinn

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Erlandsson, Lena-KarinRögnvaldsson, ThorsteinnEklund, Mona
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