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Association between cardiorespiratory fitness and metabolic health in overweight and obese adults
University Of Jyväskylä, Jyvaskyla, Finland; University Of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5096-851X
Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, ISSN 0022-4707, E-ISSN 1827-1928, Vol. 62, no 11, p. 1526-1533Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) has been inversely associated with insulin resistance and clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors among overweight and obese individuals. However, most previous studies have scaled CRF by body mass (BM) possibly inflating the association between CRF and cardiometabolic health. We investigated the associations of peak oxygen uptake (V?O2peak) and peak power output (Wpeak) scaled either by BM-1, fat free mass (FFM-1), or by allometric methods with individual cardiometabolic risk factors and clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors in 55 overweight or obese adults with metabolic syndrome. METHODS: VO2peak and Wpeak were assessed by a maximal cycle ergometer exercise test. FFM was measured by air displacement plethysmo- graph and glucose, insulin, HbA1c, triglycerides, and total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol from fasting blood samples. HOMA-IR and metabolic syndrome score (MetS) were computed. RESULTS: VO2peak and Wpeak scaled by BM-1 were inversely associated with insulin (β=-0.404 to -0.372, 95% CI: -0.704 to -0.048), HOMAIR (β=-0.442 to -0.440, 95% CI: -0.762 to -0.117), and MetS (β=-0.474 to -0.463, 95% CI: -0.798 to -0.127). Other measures of CRF were not associated with cardiometabolic risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that using BM-1 as a scaling factor confounds the associations between CRF and cardiometabolic risk in overweight/obese adults with the metabolic syndrome. © 2022 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Turin: Edizioni Minerva Medica , 2022. Vol. 62, no 11, p. 1526-1533
Keywords [en]
Insulin resistance, Metabolic syndrome, Physical fitness
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-48787DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.21.13234-7ISI: 000883786900015Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85141625315OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-48787DiVA, id: diva2:1717603
Available from: 2022-12-09 Created: 2022-12-09 Last updated: 2022-12-09Bibliographically approved

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Heinonen, Ilkka

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Haapala, Eero A.Laitinen, KirsiKalliokoski, KariKnuuti, JuhaniHeinonen, Ilkka
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