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Time use in relation to valued and satisfying occupations among people with persistent mental illness: Exploring occupational balance
Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5865-2632
Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
2010 (English)In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 231-238Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated how temporal occupational patterns, operationalized as time use and daily rhythm, are related to occupational balance, in terms of the value and satisfaction that people with persistent mental illness derive from daily occupations. The respondents, 103 individuals visiting an outpatient psychosis unit, completed a time-use diary and questionnaires targeting occupational value and satisfaction. Spending more total time in non-rest occupations (TTNR), in the categories of self-care/maintenance, work/education and play/leisure, was related to perceiving more concrete value, such as making something or learning new things. TTNR was also related to symbolic and self-reward value and to having satisfying daily occupations. A subgroup with a daily rhythm that meant being active during the day and sleeping at night time perceived more symbolic value and greater satisfaction with their daily occupations than another characterized by low activity during the day and having turned the clock around by mostly sleeping and resting during the day. Temporal occupational patterns seemed important for perceived occupational value and satisfaction with daily occupations, seen as facets of occupational balance, and a spiral type of relationship was assumed. © 2010 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Melbourne: Taylor & Francis, 2010. Vol. 17, no 4, p. 231-238
Keywords [en]
Occupational balance, Occupational value, Satisfaction, Time use
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39563DOI: 10.1080/14427591.2010.9686700Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77958548247OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-39563DiVA, id: diva2:1338248
Available from: 2019-07-21 Created: 2019-07-21 Last updated: 2019-07-22Bibliographically approved

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Erlandsson, Lena-Karin

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  • apa
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