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Firms' use of organizational, personal, and intermediary networks to gain access to resources for internationalization
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8194-2053
Department of Information Systems, Digital Entrepreneurship Hub, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
2019 (English)In: Thunderbird International Business Review, ISSN 1096-4762, E-ISSN 1520-6874, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 609-621Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores which networks are beneficial for gaining resources for firms' internationalization. Little is known about firms' use of organizational, personal, and intermediary networks to gain access to resources for internationalization. Firms are seeking resources through their organization's relationships (organizational networks) and individuals' personal contacts (personal networks). Governmental and industry actors are implementing networks to promote international growth and act as an intermediary between business actors (intermediary networks). We conduct in-depth interviews with firms and representatives for intermediary networks complemented with a survey. The findings reveal which resources are accessed through the different networks. We find organizational networks provide considerable access to most resources (except financial resources) that are beneficial for internationalization, whereas intermediary networks provide access to reputational, human, and market resources. Personal networks primarily provide access to human resources. This study contributes to theory by giving a more fine-grained understanding of how different types of networks give access to different resources valuable for internationalization. © 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, 2019. Vol. 61, no 4, p. 609-621
Keywords [en]
export promotion, intermediary networks, internationalization, organizational networks, personal networks, resources
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39523DOI: 10.1002/tie.22043Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85062720752OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-39523DiVA, id: diva2:1319696
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilKnowledge FoundationAvailable from: 2019-06-03 Created: 2019-06-03 Last updated: 2019-06-12Bibliographically approved

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Andersson, SvanteSundermeier, Janina

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
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  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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