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Entrepreneurs’ Communicative Behaviour in Technology-Based versus Service-Based Businesses — A Resource Dependence Perspective
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Knowledge Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Research (KEEN).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9584-3216
2010 (English)In: New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millennium. Vol 8 / [ed] Ray Oakey, Aard Groen, Gary Cook, & Peter Van Der Sijde, Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2010, Vol. 8, p. 133-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

To enhance the understanding of entrepreneurial communication strategies in the start-up phase of the business, a resource dependence perspective is presented. Resources can be categorized in several ways. Penrose (1959), one of the pioneers in the resource-based view, and the subsequent work of, for example, Wernerfelt (1984) and Barney (1991), have brought the individual, the entrepreneur and especially resources within the business into focus. The process school of the resource-based view focuses on processes and activities and internal strategic capabilities (Tucker, Meyer, & Westerman, 1996). Furthermore, capabilities are based on developing, carrying and exchanging information through the business's human capital (Tucker et al., 1996). Grant (1991, p. 122) defined such capabilities as ‘complex patterns of coordination and cooperation between people, and between people and (tangible) resources’. Baum, Locke, and Smith (2001) and Lee, Lee, and Pennings (2001) found that new businesses’ internal capabilities are the primary determinants of the businesses’ performance. One of the intangible resources could be a business reputation (Deephouse, 2000). A positive reputation creates advantages in order to obtain, for example, financial capital. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2010. Vol. 8, p. 133-146
Series
New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millennium, ISSN 1876-0228 ; 8
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39344DOI: 10.1108/S1876-0228(2010)0000008011Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84896509178Libris ID: 12136558ISBN: 978-0-85724-373-7 (print)ISBN: 978-0-85724-374-4 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-39344DiVA, id: diva2:1318596
Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-09-25

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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