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‘What [I] talk about when [I] am running’: Revetment Running, Ethnography and Econarratological Poetry
Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS). (FDLIS - Framtidens digitala lärande i skolan)
2018 (English)In: The Ethnographic Edge - Contemporary Ethnography Across the Disciplines, E-ISSN 2537-7426, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 9-20Article in journal (Refereed) [Artistic work] Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, nonhuman poetry is explored. Departing from an autoethnographic project based on audio recordings made while running on revetments, and which  discussed how to give voice to nonhuman actors the possibilities of nonhuman poetry, this text aims at taking it one step further by extracting poetry from the material. Ethnographically, this is discussed in terms of affect, and an 'ethnography to be'. Theoretically, the study has a posthumanist approach, with a specific focus on the econarratology of philosopher Michel Serres. The method and theory are are discussed in tandem in relation to what philospher Peter Sloterdijk has coined 'amphibian anthropology'. By stacking the bracketed words in my transcriptions, four poems emerge in which background sounds, contextual descriptions, corrections and bodily sounds form the content. Each poem is accompanied by a map made from smartphone screenshots. The prose is found to be evocative of the surroundings of the recording, and also resonating with the ideas of human language as derivative of what Serres calls the Great narrative, the story of universe and nature themselves. The proximity to water and rocks discernible in the experiment is seen as a result stemming from practicing the hope-oriented 'ethnography to be'.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hamilton: University of Waikato , 2018. Vol. 2, no 1, p. 9-20
National Category
Philosophy Literary Composition Ethnology Cultural Studies Human Aspects of ICT
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38391DOI: 10.15663/tee.v2i1.34OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-38391DiVA, id: diva2:1264723
Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2018-11-23Bibliographically approved

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Jonasson, Kalle

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3233343536373835 of 54
CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • ieee
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Language
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