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Water body type and land cover shape the dragonfly communities (Odonata) in the Pampa biome, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Lajeado, Brazil.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8700-6031
Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Lajeado, Brazil.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2926-6246
Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Lajeado, Brazil.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9241-921X
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7840-6460
2018 (English)In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 113-125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The biogeographical region known as the Pampa biome in southern Brazil, was originally mainly covered with open fields or grassland, with areas of riparian forest surrounding the water bodies. Today this landscape appears highly fragmented due to agricultural activities such as rice cultivation, extensive cattle farming, and forest plantations. Studies have shown that the Pampa biome has high levels of biodiversity and endemism, but with regard to invertebrates, this biome is still one of the least known in Brazil. We therefore designed a study comparing the dragonfly (Odonata) communities to environmental and landscape features in this area, measuring diversity by species richness, relative abundance and Shannon index. Our results showed that the Pampa is a biome very rich in odonates, and that the species communities are highly dependent on the environmental conditions of the area. Habitats such as Rivers/Streams, bordered by native grasslands and riparian forests, were shown to harbour communities that were ecologically more complex and sensitive than other habitat types. Man-made lakes and agricultural areas displayed lower levels of biodiversity and odonate communities dominated by generalist species. By combining data on the communities of Odonata and other taxa, our analyses may be instrumental in determining priority areas for future conservation measures within the area. © 2018, Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht: Springer, 2018. Vol. 22, no 1, p. 113-125
Keywords [en]
Landscape ecology, Conservation, Grasslands, Macroinvertebrates
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38315DOI: 10.1007/s10841-017-0042-8ISI: 000427390500010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85040050570OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-38315DiVA, id: diva2:1263172
Note

Funding Agency:

Capes (Coordenacao de Aperfeicoamento de Pessoal de Nivel Superior)

UNIVATES

Halmstad University Grant Number: 88881.068147/2014-01 

Available from: 2018-11-14 Created: 2018-11-14 Last updated: 2018-11-15Bibliographically approved

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Sahlén, Göran

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Renner, SamuelPérico, EduardoSchmidt Dalzochio, MarinaSahlén, Göran
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