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Biography [eng]

After working in the automotive industry for several years Lena joined Viktoria Institute in 2007 to improve the understanding of what challaneges and opportunities the automotive industry was facing with the increase of digital material in product and process. After finishing her thesis focusing on Digitalization Dynamics she joined Halmstad Unviersity in 2018. 

Biography [swe]

Lena's research interest includes various aspects of digitalization dynamics. Her current  focus aims to better understand ethical and moral consequences of digital transformation. 

Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Hylving, L. & Bygstad, B. (2019). Nuanced Responses to Enterprise Architecture Management: Loyalty, Voice, and Exit. Journal of Management Information Systems, 36(1), 14-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nuanced Responses to Enterprise Architecture Management: Loyalty, Voice, and Exit
2019 (English)In: Journal of Management Information Systems, ISSN 0742-1222, E-ISSN 1557-928X, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 14-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Enterprise Architecture Management (EAM) aims to deal with the complex- ities of information technology (IT) solutions and to achieve more organizational agility. EAM is a holistic approach to IT architecture, but the results of the approach have been variable. An under-researched aspect of EAM is how different organizational units respond to the call for a holistic approach. In this study, we investigate how different stakeholders in a large governmental agency connected to three on-going projects and their response to EAM initiatives. With a qualitative approach, we identify three options of response to EAM initiatives: (1) active compliance with the EAM strategy, (2) loyal but passive response, and (3) rebel solutions. We argue for the need of a more nuanced repertoire of actions for dealing with EAM and show how these responses are useful for understanding and managing successful EAM.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Enterprise architecture, IT architecture, organizational agility
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39186 (URN)10.1080/07421222.2018.1550549 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-04-01 Created: 2019-04-01 Last updated: 2019-04-02Bibliographically approved
Hylving, L. & Bygstad, B. (2018). Responding to Enterprise Architecture Initiatives: Loyalty, Voice and Exit. In: Proceedings of the 51st Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences: . Paper presented at HICSS-51, Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 2018, Waikoloa Village, Hawaii, USA, January 3-6, 2018 (pp. 2363-2372). Washington, D.C.: IEEE Computer Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Responding to Enterprise Architecture Initiatives: Loyalty, Voice and Exit
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 51st Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, Washington, D.C.: IEEE Computer Society, 2018, p. 2363-2372Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Many large organizations have on-going Enterprise Architecture initiatives. Key aims include achieving more organizational agility, and to tidy up a messy portfolio of IT silo systems. A holistic approach to IT architecture has been an accepted strategy, but the results of these initiatives have been variable. An under-researched aspect is how different organizational units respond to the call for a holistic approach. In this study, we investigate how different stakeholders connected to three ongoing projects responded to the call for EA. With a qualitative approach, we identify three options of response to EA initiatives: (i) compliance with the EA strategy, (ii) loyal but isolated response, and (iii) rebel solutions. We argue for the need of a more nuanced repertoire of actions for dealing with EA, and show how these responses are useful for understanding and managing successful EA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington, D.C.: IEEE Computer Society, 2018
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39242 (URN)10.24251/HICSS.2018.297 (DOI)978-0-9981331-1-9 (ISBN)
Conference
HICSS-51, Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 2018, Waikoloa Village, Hawaii, USA, January 3-6, 2018
Available from: 2019-04-18 Created: 2019-04-18 Last updated: 2019-05-09Bibliographically approved
Hylving, L. (2017). Sociomaterial Quasi-Objects: From Interface to Experience. AIS Transactions on Human-Computer Interaction, 9(3), 202-219
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sociomaterial Quasi-Objects: From Interface to Experience
2017 (English)In: AIS Transactions on Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1944-3900, E-ISSN 1944-3900, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 202-219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, I examine design practices by contrasting the Cartesian view of separation with an ontological perspective and argue for a dynamic, multiple, and entangled world (namely, sociomateriality). In the digital era we live in, sociomateriality helps move design practices forward in order to embrace constant changes and re-configurations. The word interface manifests a worldview of separation. Researchers typically conceive an interface as belonging to an artifact; that is, the technology, the material. More so, [people] typically considers user interfaces as the layer that separates and connects the technology and the user, which enables interaction. I recognize the limitations of the well-established perspective of interface design and contrast two traditional HCI concepts (namely, usability and context) from a Cartesian versus a sociomaterial perspective. However, to embrace and capitalize on the emergent digital reality, we need a new vocabulary. I introduce helpful concepts that one can use when designing and talking about experiences, and I ground the concepts in a sociomaterial ontological perspective. The concepts and design approach presented in this paper invite and encourage researchers to focus on experiences as sociomaterial entanglements and re-configurations and not as separated social and material entities. By using Michel Serres’ (1980) term quasi-objects, I call attention to the complexity of sociomaterial entanglements that make up experiences and emphasize a holistic and inclusive design approach. In addition, introducing sociomaterial concepts, such as agential cuts and intra-actions, into the human-computer interaction domain invites researchers to think and act in new ways in the era of digitalized experiences. I examine the benefits of the sociomaterial design approach and present practical guidelines on how to approach experiential design with a sociomaterial take.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Atlanta, GA: Association for Information Systems, 2017
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39241 (URN)
Available from: 2019-04-18 Created: 2019-04-18 Last updated: 2019-05-03Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, I. & Hylving, L. (2017). The Drive for New Driving Interfaces: Transformational Change in the Era of Digitalization. interactions, 24(3), 54-59
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Drive for New Driving Interfaces: Transformational Change in the Era of Digitalization
2017 (English)In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 54-59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies of HMI development at Volvo Car Group show that making HMI visible and tangible, establishing areas for cross-organizational collaboration, and reinventing the organization and its processes have all enabled it to better respond to the challenges of digitalization. The team focused on two changes made in the development process over the past. First, new software simulation tools were rapidly introduced, shifting the nature of development. Second, a new HMI laboratory was implemented that enabled intensified early testing and joint discussions across the organization. To enable well-founded decisions during the development process, a range of new simulation and prototyping tools were introduced. With the tools came opportunities and a drive to experiment and explore during the development process . For an interface to be road-ready, developing and evaluating interfaces from a desk do not suffice. The need for a new HMI test facility, including a driving simulator, became apparent. With the new tools, iterative design processes and higher user involvement became further embedded in the organization. While these changes allowed for new ways of working and innovating, they also resulted in more engaged developers who enjoyed their work. Department named Digital User Experience (DUX) was created. It approached car development solely from an enduser perspective, with the ambition of bringing some balance to the technology-minded organization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39243 (URN)10.1145/3061715 (DOI)2-s2.0-85018994334 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-18 Created: 2019-04-18 Last updated: 2019-05-06Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, V. & Hylving, L. (2017). The Effect of Anarchistic Actions in Digital Product Innovation Networks: The Case of "Over the Air" Software Updates. In: Proceedings of the 50th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS): . Paper presented at 50th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2017, Hilton Waikoloa Village, Hawaii, USA, January 4-7, 2017 (pp. 5763-5772). Honolulu: Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of Anarchistic Actions in Digital Product Innovation Networks: The Case of "Over the Air" Software Updates
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the 50th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), Honolulu: Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS) , 2017, p. 5763-5772Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we explore mirroring challenges when an incumbent firm endeavor digital innovation. More specifically, we describe how AutoInc, organized according to the physical vehicle it produces, is challenged when an “over the air” software service is developed and implemented. Using the mirroring hypothesis as a point of departure to understand existing and emerging innovation networks, we recognize anarchistic actions. The analysis reveals the emergence of anarchic actions and how they challenge well-established federative innovation networks within the organization. With continued focus on technology, the project and organization disregarded necessary social structure development, which resulted in reduced capabilities to utilize the digitalized service. This qualitative paper also illustrates how the mirroring hypothesis, although originating from product innovation literature, can be used to understand digitalization dynamics. To the end, the analysis shows that the digital product innovation classification structure may need additional tuning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Honolulu: Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), 2017
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39244 (URN)10.24251/HICSS.2017.695 (DOI)978-0-9981331-0-2 (ISBN)
Conference
50th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2017, Hilton Waikoloa Village, Hawaii, USA, January 4-7, 2017
Available from: 2019-04-18 Created: 2019-04-18 Last updated: 2019-04-25Bibliographically approved
Hylving, L. (2016). A Call for Phronesis in Transport Research and Practice. In: : . Paper presented at 23rd ITS World Congress, Melbourne, Australia, 10-14 October, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Call for Phronesis in Transport Research and Practice
2016 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Keywords
Value-based rationality, Innovation, Organization
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39246 (URN)
Conference
23rd ITS World Congress, Melbourne, Australia, 10-14 October, 2016
Available from: 2019-04-18 Created: 2019-04-18 Last updated: 2019-10-15Bibliographically approved
Hylving, L. & Koutsikouri, D. (2016). Phronesis and Digital Transformation: Going from Physical to Digital Innovation Practices. In: : . Paper presented at 32nd EGOS (European Group for Organizational Studies) Colloquium, Naples, Italy, July 7–9, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phronesis and Digital Transformation: Going from Physical to Digital Innovation Practices
2016 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39248 (URN)
Conference
32nd EGOS (European Group for Organizational Studies) Colloquium, Naples, Italy, July 7–9, 2016
Available from: 2019-04-18 Created: 2019-04-18 Last updated: 2019-05-09Bibliographically approved
Hylving, L. & Koutsikouri, D. (2016). Putting Phronesis to Work in Digital Innovation. In: Sprague R.H. & Bui T.X. (Ed.), 2016 49th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS): . Paper presented at 49th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2016, Grand Hyatt on the Island of Kauai, Koloa, United States, 5-8 January, 2016 (pp. 4624-4633). New York: IEEE Computer Society, Article ID 7427760.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Putting Phronesis to Work in Digital Innovation
2016 (English)In: 2016 49th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS) / [ed] Sprague R.H. & Bui T.X., New York: IEEE Computer Society, 2016, p. 4624-4633, article id 7427760Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper uses the Aristotelian concept of phronesis (practical wisdom) as a sensitizing device to explore digital materiality in relation to user experience. We studied a digital innovation called Prudence, and observed that it possesses material properties including sensitivity to particulars, interactive ability, open-mindedness, and future orientation, making it context-aware. These properties quintessentially enabled the solution to be 'phronetic', and attune to its user's flow of activities and routines, to deliver 'good' user experiences. The study provides an opportunity for extending and strengthening current and emergent theories on digital materiality by incorporating phronesis as a vital ingredient to understand experiential computing. It also highlights the importance of embracing value-rationality to attain the kind of user delight that goes beyond what can be pre-defined in a specification. Overall, the paper contributes to show the fruitfulness of appropriating the notion of phronesis into the field of digital innovation. © 2016 IEEE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: IEEE Computer Society, 2016
Series
Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, E-ISSN 1530-1605
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39249 (URN)000432711504084 ()2-s2.0-84975480364 (Scopus ID)978-0-7695-5670-3 (ISBN)
Conference
49th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2016, Grand Hyatt on the Island of Kauai, Koloa, United States, 5-8 January, 2016
Available from: 2019-04-18 Created: 2019-04-18 Last updated: 2019-05-07Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, I., Hylving, L., Rydström, A. & Gkouskos, D. (2016). The Drive for New Driving Interfaces: Researching a Driver Interface from Design Intent to End-User Experience. In: NordiCHI'16: Game-Changing Design : proceedings of the 9th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction : Gothenburg, Sweden, 23-27 October, 2016. Paper presented at 9th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, NordiCHI 2016, Lindholmen Congress Center, Gothenburg, Sweden, 23-27 October, 2016. New York, NY: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID 125.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Drive for New Driving Interfaces: Researching a Driver Interface from Design Intent to End-User Experience
2016 (English)In: NordiCHI'16: Game-Changing Design : proceedings of the 9th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction : Gothenburg, Sweden, 23-27 October, 2016, New York, NY: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, article id 125Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper examines the development and the end-user experience of a digital driver information module, with the aim to research the adoption of user experience practice in a large industry organization and the influence of the practice on the end-user experience. Eight developers from the automotive company were interviewed, as well as eight end-users. The module was the first all-digital driver information module for the company. A number of organizational and procedural changes were required to deliver a novel user experience, such as hiring new competences and employing new simulation and development tools. For the end-users, the experience of the digital user interface played a significant role in creating pleasure of use and emotional bonds to the car. The results highlight the benefits for large organizations to adopt to flexible user experience development practices, such as cross-organizational cooperation, iterative prototyping and rapid user testing. © 2016 ACM.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016
Keywords
User experience, industry experience, driver information, design, mirroring organization, automotive
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39247 (URN)10.1145/2971485.2995348 (DOI):000390298600125 ()2-s2.0-84997234828 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-4763-1 (ISBN)
Conference
9th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, NordiCHI 2016, Lindholmen Congress Center, Gothenburg, Sweden, 23-27 October, 2016
Available from: 2019-04-18 Created: 2019-04-18 Last updated: 2019-04-26Bibliographically approved
Hylving, L. (2015). Competing Values in the Era of Digitalization. In: Tung X. Bui & Ralph H. Sprague, Jr. (Ed.), Proceedings of the 48th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences: HICSS 2015. Paper presented at 48th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2015, Grand Hyatt, Kauai, HI, United States, 5-8 January, 2015 (pp. 4161-4170). Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Computer Society, Article ID 7070318.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Competing Values in the Era of Digitalization
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the 48th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences: HICSS 2015 / [ed] Tung X. Bui & Ralph H. Sprague, Jr., Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Computer Society, 2015, p. 4161-4170, article id 7070318Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This case study examines three different digital innovation projects within Auto Inc - a large European automaker. By using the competing values framework as a theoretical lens we explore how dynamic capabilities occur in a firm trying to meet increasing demands in originating and innovating from digitalization. In this digitalization process, our study indicates that established socio-technical congruences are being challenged. More so, we pinpoint the need for organizations to find ways to embrace new experimental learning processes in the era of digitalization. While such a change requires long-term commitment and vision, this study presents three informal enablers for such experimental processes these enablers are timing, persistence, and contacts. © 2015 IEEE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Computer Society, 2015
Series
Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, ISSN 1060-3425
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39250 (URN)10.1109/HICSS.2015.499 (DOI)000366264104035 ()2-s2.0-84944198512 (Scopus ID)978-1-4799-7367-5 (ISBN)
Conference
48th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2015, Grand Hyatt, Kauai, HI, United States, 5-8 January, 2015
Funder
Vinnova
Available from: 2019-04-18 Created: 2019-04-18 Last updated: 2019-05-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8529-0072

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