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Jonasson, Kalle
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Carlsson, B., Jonasson, K. & Jönsson, K. (2019). Introduction: the blend of science and sport. Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, 22(9), 1497-1500
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: the blend of science and sport
2019 (English)In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 22, no 9, p. 1497-1500Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon: Routledge, 2019
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38392 (URN)10.1080/17430437.2018.1435037 (DOI)000472564700001 ()2-s2.0-85041902628 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2019-07-30
Jonasson, K. (2019). 'Sport qua science': Michel Serres's ball as an asset of knowledge. Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, 22(9), 1512-1527
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'Sport qua science': Michel Serres's ball as an asset of knowledge
2019 (English)In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 22, no 9, p. 1512-1527Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article concerns the use of sport as an asset of knowledge in academia. The background to this is sport’s neglected role and isolation in academia, save for in sundry sports sciences. By mapping the academic use of philosopher Michel Serres’ sport metaphors, a new perspective of the relationship between sport and science is explored. A mixed-methods approach was chosen to review the literature using Serres’ concept of the ‘quasi-object’. The findings show that the concept appeals to a wide array of disciplines within the social sciences and the humanities. The article suggests that there exists a parallel sport science in academia that flies under the radar of regular sport disciplines, a sort of ‘sport AS humanities’. This proposed ‘sportive science’ focuses on other aspects of sport than its already existing sport study counterparts. Thus, sport qua science acknowledges its topic as an asset of knowledge, not as a mirror of society. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Humanities, Sport, Philosophy, Michel Serres, Bruno Latour, Posthumanities, Knowledge
National Category
Philosophy Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36480 (URN)10.1080/17430437.2018.1435029 (DOI)000472564700003 ()2-s2.0-85042126900 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2019-07-30
Jonasson, K. (2018). ‘What [I] talk about when [I] am running’: Revetment Running, Ethnography and Econarratological Poetry. The Ethnographic Edge - Contemporary Ethnography Across the Disciplines, 2(1), 9-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘What [I] talk about when [I] am running’: Revetment Running, Ethnography and Econarratological Poetry
2018 (English)In: The Ethnographic Edge - Contemporary Ethnography Across the Disciplines, E-ISSN 2537-7426, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 9-20Article in journal (Refereed) [Artistic work] Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, nonhuman poetry is explored. Departing from an autoethnographic project based on audio recordings made while running on revetments, and which  discussed how to give voice to nonhuman actors the possibilities of nonhuman poetry, this text aims at taking it one step further by extracting poetry from the material. Ethnographically, this is discussed in terms of affect, and an 'ethnography to be'. Theoretically, the study has a posthumanist approach, with a specific focus on the econarratology of philosopher Michel Serres. The method and theory are are discussed in tandem in relation to what philospher Peter Sloterdijk has coined 'amphibian anthropology'. By stacking the bracketed words in my transcriptions, four poems emerge in which background sounds, contextual descriptions, corrections and bodily sounds form the content. Each poem is accompanied by a map made from smartphone screenshots. The prose is found to be evocative of the surroundings of the recording, and also resonating with the ideas of human language as derivative of what Serres calls the Great narrative, the story of universe and nature themselves. The proximity to water and rocks discernible in the experiment is seen as a result stemming from practicing the hope-oriented 'ethnography to be'.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hamilton: University of Waikato, 2018
National Category
Philosophy Literary Composition Ethnology Cultural Studies Human Aspects of ICT
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38391 (URN)10.15663/tee.v2i1.34 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2018-11-23Bibliographically approved
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