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Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Aili, K., Bergman, S. & Haglund, E. (2019). Adding information on widespread pain to the start back screening tool when identifying low back pain patients at increased risk for poor prognosis.. In: Annals of the Rheumatic diseases: . Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR. , 78, Article ID A1457.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adding information on widespread pain to the start back screening tool when identifying low back pain patients at increased risk for poor prognosis.
2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic diseases, 2019, Vol. 78, article id A1457Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Keywords
low back pain, screening, primary care
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40947 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.4623 (DOI)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-14
Drab, B., Aili, K., Haglund, E. & Bergman, S. (2019). Chronic pain and sick leave in a 21-year follow up.. In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases: . Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR. , 78, Article ID A122.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic pain and sick leave in a 21-year follow up.
2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 2019, Vol. 78, article id A122Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Keywords
Chronic pain, Sickness absence
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40944 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.2021 (DOI)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-14
Westergården, M., Aili, K. & Larsson, I. (2019). Living every-day life in the shadow of pain or live every-day life with the pain in the shadow – A constant balancing. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), Madrid, Spain, June, 12-15, 2019. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 78(Suppl 2), 1063-1064
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Living every-day life in the shadow of pain or live every-day life with the pain in the shadow – A constant balancing
2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, no Suppl 2, p. 1063-1064Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Approximately 10% of the population report chronic widespread pain (CWP), the condition is more common in women than in men. Long-term pain is a public health problem. For most women, the pain interferes with many aspects of every-day life and implies large consequences. Thus, knowledge about how to facilitate life for these women is important.

Objectives: To explore women’s experiences of how CWP influence their daily life

Methods: The study has a latent qualitative content analysis design 1 . Individual interviews were conducted in 19 women 45-67 of age, who had reported CWP in a survey 2016. CWP was defined according to the 1990 ACR criteria for fibromyalgia. Pain that had lasted for more than three months, during the last 12 months, was considered chronic. A latent qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the main questions “Can you describe your experiences of living with CWP?” and “How do the CWP influence your life today?” The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded into eight subcategories and three categories; represent the manifest content, and a latent theme exploring the interpreted content of women’s experiences of how CWP influence their every-day life.

Results: The interviewed women expressed a life with CWP as “Living every-day life in the shadow of pain or live every-day life with the pain in the shadow” including three categories; the experience of alienation, limitations and plasticity. 1) The experiences of alienation appeared in the subcategories; suspicion and loneliness. Suspicion meant a feeling of not be taken seriously by healthcare and authorities and loneliness meant not being able to participate in social contexts. 2) The experiences of limitations in daily life includes the subcategories; barriers, stress, and dependence of other people. Barriers meant that fatigue limits the activities in every-day life, stress that constitutes limitations in life and dependence on other people’ support. 3) The experiences of plasticity referred to the subcategories resignation, adjustment and resistance. Resignation meant refraining from activities that could affect the pain, such as gardening, walking and dancing. Adjustment were manifested by making the best of the situation, and resistance meant to resist letting the pain set the terms, to give the pain a fight.

Conclusion: Women with CWP have to deal with their physical, mental, social and spiritual environment in every-day life. They express a constant balancing in their life between mastering the pain in order to continue living as normal, and allowing the pain to set the terms, i.e. living every-day life in the shadow of pain or live every-day life with the pain in the shadow. Healthcare professionals may consider supporting the patients in finding their individual counterweight to manage life in order to reach better treatment outcome. © Westergården, Aili & Larsson 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Chronic Widespread Pain
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40915 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.3692 (DOI)000472207103186 ()
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), Madrid, Spain, June, 12-15, 2019
Available from: 2019-11-12 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2019-11-14
Westergården, M., Aili, K. & Larsson, I. (2019). Living every-day life in the shadow of pain or live every-day life with the pain in the shadow – a constant balancing. In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases: . Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR. , Article ID A1063.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Living every-day life in the shadow of pain or live every-day life with the pain in the shadow – a constant balancing
2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 2019, article id A1063Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Keywords
Chronic widespread pain, health
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40945 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.3692 (DOI)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-14
Aili, K., Campbell, P., Michaleff, Z., Strauss, V., Jordan, K., Bremander, A., . . . Bergman, S. (2019). Long term trajectories of chronic widespread pain: a 21-year prospective cohort latent class analysis.. In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases: . Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR. , 78, Article ID A239.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long term trajectories of chronic widespread pain: a 21-year prospective cohort latent class analysis.
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2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 2019, Vol. 78, article id A239Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Keywords
Chronic pain, public health
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40943 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.2993 (DOI)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-14
Aili, K., Bergman, S., Bramander, A., Haglund, E. & Larsson, I. (2019). Passive coping strategies but not physical function are associated with worse mental health, in women with chronic widespread pain– a mixed method study. In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases: . Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR. , 78, Article ID A2159.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Passive coping strategies but not physical function are associated with worse mental health, in women with chronic widespread pain– a mixed method study
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2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 2019, Vol. 78, article id A2159Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Keywords
Chronic widespread pain, health, mental health, coping
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40949 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.5393 (DOI)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-14
Aili, K., Bergman, S., Bremander, A., Haglund, E. & Larsson, I. (2019). Passive coping strategies but not physicalfunction are associated with worse mental health, in women with chronicwidespread pain– a mixed method study. In: Annual Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases: . Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR. , Article ID A2159.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Passive coping strategies but not physicalfunction are associated with worse mental health, in women with chronicwidespread pain– a mixed method study
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2019 (English)In: Annual Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 2019, article id A2159Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: Chronic widespread pain (CWP) is a common condition (approximately 10% prevalence), that affects women twice as often as men. There is a lack of knowledge in how different coping strategies relates to health status during CWP development in a general population.

Objectives: To explore different ways of coping with CWP and to relate the different coping strategies to health-related factors, before and after developing CWP.

Methods: A sequential explorative mixed methods study including 19 women 45-67 of age, who had reported CWP in a survey 2016, but not in 1995. Individual interviews were analysed with a phenomenographic approach, and resulted in four categories of coping strategies. These categories were further explored with regard to four dimensions of health status (physical function, bodily pain, vitality and mental health) as measured by SF-36 (0-100, a lower score indicates more disability) and sleep problems measured both in 1995, and 2016.

Results: The qualitative analysis revealed four categories representing different coping strategies, where each woman was labelled by the most dominant category; the mastering woman, the persistent woman, the compliant woman and the conquered woman. The first two categories emerged as being active coping strategies, and the latter two as passive. Women with passive strategies reported significantly lower vitality (median 57.5 vs 75, p=0.007) and worse mental health (median 54 vs 93, p=0.021) in 1995, before they had developed CWP compared with those with active coping strategies. No differences were seen between the groups on physical function, bodily pain or sleep.

In 2016, there were still a difference between the passive and active group regarding mental health (median 56 vs 80, p=0.022), but not for vitality (median 35 vs 40, p=0.707). No differences were seen between the groups on physical function or bodily pain. All eight women with passive strategies reported problems with sleep in 2016, as compared to 6 of the 11 women with active strategies (p=0.045).

Conclusion: Women that reported CWP in 2016, but not in 1995, described both active and passive coping strategies. The qualitative findings were associated with differences in vitality and mental health already in 1995, before they had developed CWP. Further, those with passive coping strategies reported worse health with regard to mental health and sleep problems in 2016. Interestingly, the groups did not differ in bodily pain or physical function neither in 1995 nor in 2016, which implicates the importance for the clinician to take the typical coping strategy into consideration, when meeting these patients in clinical settings.

Keywords
chronic widespread pain
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40913 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.5393 (DOI)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR
Available from: 2019-11-12 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2019-11-12
Svensson, M., Larsson, I. & Aili, K. (2019). Women’s experience of the journey to chronic widespread pain – a qualitative study. In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases: . Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR. , 78, Article ID A657.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Women’s experience of the journey to chronic widespread pain – a qualitative study
2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 2019, Vol. 78, article id A657Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Keywords
Chronic widespread pain, health
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40946 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.2298 (DOI)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-14
Svensson, M., Larsson, I. & Aili, K. (2019). Women’s experience of the journey to chronicwidespread pain – a qualitative study.. In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases: . Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR. Madrid, Spain, 12-15 June 2019.. , 78, Article ID A657.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Women’s experience of the journey to chronicwidespread pain – a qualitative study.
2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 2019, Vol. 78, article id A657Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: Chronic widespread pain (CWP) is a major burden to both the person and the community. Non-tumor chronic pain is one of the most common causes for long-term sickness absence in Sweden. The prevalence of CWP in the general population is approximately 10%, and the condition is almost twice as prevalent in women, than in men. Increased understanding of how women with CWP describe triggering factors of pain and pain progress would be of importance when preventing poor pain prognosis, and when customizing the treatment strategy in a setting with person-centered care.

Objectives: To explore experiences of factors influencing the progress and severity of pain among women who have developed CWP within the last 21 years.

Methods: This is a descriptive study, using a qualitative content analysis with an abductive approach 1 . Nineteen women reporting CWP in a survey 2016, between 45-67 (median 57) years of age, who had not reported CWP in a survey 1995, participated in the study. Data were collected through individual interviews with open-ended questions: “Can you describe how your CWP has developed the last 20 years?”, “How did your CWP change over time?” and “Have you experienced any important events that have influenced the development of your CWP?” Data were analyzed through a manifest qualitative content analysis and six categories emerged.

Results: The women described their journey to CWP in terms of triggering, aggravating and consolidating factors. Six different categories emerged; physical strain, emotional strain, social strain, work-related strain, biological strain and environmental strain.  Physical strain included strenuous physical activities in leisure time, having muscle tension, inactivity or sleeping problems.  Emotional strain included being depressed, worried and stressed, as well as neglecting the pain.  Social strain included to prioritize other people before oneself and to meet distrust from the social surroundings.  Work-related strain included heavy, monotonous and stressful work but also sedentary work.  Biological strain referred to heredity, age and infections.  Environmental strain meant that the climate or weather aggravated the pain.

Conclusion: The women in the study described how their journey to CWP was influenced by both external and internal strains. The six categories representing different types of strains were recurrent in a context describing triggering, aggravating and consolidating factors. This highlights the complexity of individual pain progress and argues for the importance of person-centred care approaches and rehabilitation programs. The fact that women with CWP feel mistrust from healthcare professionals indicates that the current care approach needs to be changed.

Keywords
Chronic Widespread Pain
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40914 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.2298 (DOI)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR. Madrid, Spain, 12-15 June 2019.
Available from: 2019-11-12 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2019-11-12
Bergman, S., Haglund, E., Aili, K., Olsson, C. & Bremander, A. (2018). Chronic widespread pain, sleep problems and pressure pain thresholds in a population sample. Paper presented at EULAR, Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, 13-16 June, 2018 Amsterdam, Netherlands. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 7(2), 1645-1646
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic widespread pain, sleep problems and pressure pain thresholds in a population sample
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2018 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 1645-1646Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38548 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2018-eular.6827 (DOI)000444351005059 ()
Conference
EULAR, Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, 13-16 June, 2018 Amsterdam, Netherlands
Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4260-7399

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