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Gadd, Henrik
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Gadd, H. & Werner, S. (2015). Thermal energy storage systems for district heating and cooling (1ed.). In: Luisa F. Cabeza (Ed.), Advances in Thermal Energy Storage Systems: Methods and Applications (pp. 467-478). Cambridge: Woodhead Publishing Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thermal energy storage systems for district heating and cooling
2015 (English)In: Advances in Thermal Energy Storage Systems: Methods and Applications / [ed] Luisa F. Cabeza, Cambridge: Woodhead Publishing Limited, 2015, 1, p. 467-478Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The context for this chapter is the current use and typical applications of thermal energy storages within contemporary district heating and cooling systems in the Nordic countries. Examples include a new assessment method, distributed heat storages, and hourly, daily, weekly, and seasonal heat and cold storages. Specific sizes have been estimated for 209 heat storages and 9 cold storages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Woodhead Publishing Limited, 2015 Edition: 1
Series
Woodhead Publishing Series in Energy ; 66
Keywords
district heating, district cooling, heat storage, cold storage, Nordic countries
National Category
Energy Engineering Energy Systems Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-27091 (URN)10.1533/9781782420965.4.467 (DOI)2-s2.0-84942086233 (Scopus ID)978-1-78242-088-0 (ISBN)978-1-78242-096-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-11-19 Created: 2014-11-19 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Gadd, H. & Werner, S. (2014). Achieving low return temperature from district heating substations. Applied Energy, 136, 59-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Achieving low return temperature from district heating substations
2014 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 136, p. 59-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

District heating systems contribute with low primary energy supply in the energy system by providing heat from heat assets like combined heat and power, waste incineration, geothermal heat, wood waste, and industrial excess heat. These heat assets would otherwise be wasted or not used. Still, there are several reasons to use these assets as efficiently as possible, i.e., ability to compete, further reduced use of primary energy resources, and less environmental impact. Low supply and return temperatures in the distribution networks are important operational factors for obtaining an efficient district heating system. In order to achieve low return temperatures, customer substations and secondary heating systems must perform without temperature faults. In future fourth generation district heating systems, lower distribution temperatures will be required. To be able to have well-performing substations and customer secondary systems, continuous commissioning will be necessary to be able to detect temperature faults without any delays. It is also of great importance to be able to have quality control of eliminated faults. Automatic meter reading systems, recently introduced into district heating systems, have paved the way for developing new methods to be used in continuous commissioning of substations. This paper presents a novel method using the temperature difference signature for temperature difference fault detection and quality assurance of eliminated faults. Annual hourly datasets from 140 substations have been analysed for temperature difference faults. From these 140 substations, 14 were identified with temperature difference appearing or eliminated during the analysed year. Nine appeared during the year, indicating an annual temperature difference fault frequency of more than 6%. © 2014 The Authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kidlington: Pergamon Press, 2014
Keywords
District heating, Temperature difference, Low return temperature, Low supply temperature, Hourly meter reading, Fault detection
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-26881 (URN)10.1016/j.apenergy.2014.09.022 (DOI)000345725800008 ()2-s2.0-84907790387 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work was financially supported by Fjärrsyn, the Swedish district heating research programme, and Öresundskraft, by providing meter readings from 140 substations.

Available from: 2014-10-24 Created: 2014-10-24 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Gadd, H. & Werner, S. (2013). Daily heat load variations in Swedish district heating systems. Applied Energy, 106, 47-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Daily heat load variations in Swedish district heating systems
2013 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 106, p. 47-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Heat load variations in district heating systems are both seasonal and daily. Seasonal variations have mainly its origin from variations in outdoor temperature over the year. The origin of daily variations is mainly induced by social patterns due to customer social behaviours. Heat load variations cause increased costs because of increased peak heat load capacity and expensive peak fuels. Seasonal heat load variations are well-documented and analysed, but analyses of daily heat load variations are scarce. Published analyses are either case studies or models that try to predict daily heat load variations. There is a dearth of suitable assessment methods for more general analyses of existing daily load variations. In this paper, a novel assessment method for describing daily variations is presented. It is applied on district heating systems, but the method is generic and can be applied on every kind of activity where daily variations occur. The method was developed from two basic conditions: independent of system size and no use of external parameters other than of the time series analysed. The method consists of three parameters: the annual relative daily variation that is a benchmarking parameter between systems, the relative daily variation that describes the expected heat storage size to eliminate daily variations, and the relative hourly variation that describes the loading and unloading capacity to and from the heat storage. The assessment method could be used either for design purposes or for evaluation of existing storage. The method has been applied on 20 Swedish district heating systems ranging from small to large systems. The three parameters have been estimated for time series of hourly average heat loads for calendar years. The results show that the hourly heat load additions beyond the daily averages, vary between 3% and 6% of the annual volume of heat supplied to the network. Hereby, the daily variations are smaller than the seasonal variations, since the daily heat load additions, beyond the annual average heat load, are between 17% and 28% of the annual volume of heat supplied to the network. The size of short term heat storage to eliminate the daily heat load variations has been estimated to a heat volume corresponding to about 17% of the average daily heat supplied into the network. This conclusion can also be expressed as an average demand of 2.5 m3 of heat storage volume per TJ of heat supplied by assuming a water temperature difference of 40 C. The capacity for loading and unloading the storage should be equal to about half of the annual average heat load for heat supplied into the network. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Pergamon Press, 2013
Keywords
District heating, daily heat load variations, heat storage, seasonal heat load variation, novel method
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-22166 (URN)10.1016/j.apenergy.2013.01.030 (DOI)000317544400005 ()2-s2.0-84873677803 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: Fjärrsyn, the Swedish district heating research programme, and Öresundskraft

Available from: 2013-05-17 Created: 2013-05-17 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Gadd, H. & Werner, S. (2013). Heat load patterns in district heating substations. Applied Energy, 108, 176-183
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heat load patterns in district heating substations
2013 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 108, p. 176-183Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Future smart energy grids will require more information exchange between interfaces in the energy system. One interface where dearth of information exists is in district heating substations, being the interfaces between the distribution network and the customer building heating systems. Previously, manual meter readings were collected once or a few times a year. Today, automatic meter readings are available resulting in low cost hourly meter reading data. In a district heating system, errors and deviations in customer substations propagates through the network to the heat supply plants. In order to reduce future customer and heat supplier costs, a demand appears for smart functions identifying errors and deviations in the substations. Hereby, also a research demand appears for defining normal and abnormal heat load patterns in customer substations. The main purpose with this article is to perform an introductory analysis of several high resolution measurements in order to provide valuable information about substations for creating future applications in smart heat grids. One year of hourly heat meter readings from 141 substations in two district heating networks were analysed. The connected customer buildings were classified into five different customer categories and four typical heat load patterns were identified. Two descriptive parameters, annual relative daily variation and annual relative seasonal variation, were defined from each 1 year sequence for identifying normal and abnormal heat load patterns. The three major conclusions are associated both with the method used and the objects analysed. First, normal heat load patterns vary with applied control strategy, season, and customer category. Second, it is possible to identify obvious outliers compared to normal heat loads with the two descriptive parameters used in this initial analysis. Third, the developed method can probably be enhanced by redefining the customer categories by their indoor activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Pergamon Press, 2013
Keywords
District heating, Heat load variation, Automatic meter reading, Heat load pattern, Smart heat grids, Smart energy grids
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-22167 (URN)10.1016/j.apenergy.2013.02.062 (DOI)000320484900019 ()2-s2.0-84876321273 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-05-17 Created: 2013-05-17 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Gadd, H. & Werner, S. (2010). Daily Heat Load Variation in Swedish District Heating Systems. In: 12th International Symposium on District Heating and Cooling. Paper presented at 12th International Symposium on District Heating and Cooling; Tallinn, Estonia from September 5th to September 7th, 2010 (pp. 199-201). Tallinn, Estonia: Tallinn University of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Daily Heat Load Variation in Swedish District Heating Systems
2010 (English)In: 12th International Symposium on District Heating and Cooling, Tallinn, Estonia: Tallinn University of Technology , 2010, p. 199-201Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

If daily heat load variations could be eliminated in district heating-systems, it would make the operation of the district heating system less costly and more competitive . There would be several advantages in the operation such as:

  • Less use of expensive peak load power where often expensive fuels are used.
  • Less need for peak load power capacity.
  • Easier to optimize the operation that leads to higher conversion efficiencies.
  • Less need for maintenance because of more smooth operation of the plants

There are a number of ways to handle the daily variations of the heat load. Two often used are large heat storages or using the district heating network as temporary storage. If it would be possible to centrally control the customer substations, it would also be possible to use heavy buildings connected to the district heating system as heat storages.

To be able to find the best way to reduce or even eliminate the daily heat load variations, you need to understand the characteristics of the daily variations. This paper will describe a way of characterizing daily heat load variations in some Swedish district heating-systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tallinn, Estonia: Tallinn University of Technology, 2010
Keywords
district heating, heat load, daily variation, heat storage
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-6020 (URN)2-s2.0-79952653240 (Scopus ID)978-9949-23-015-0 (ISBN)
Conference
12th International Symposium on District Heating and Cooling; Tallinn, Estonia from September 5th to September 7th, 2010
Projects
Fjärrsyn, SF
Available from: 2010-09-29 Created: 2010-09-28 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
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