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Edvardsson, Arne
Publications (2 of 2) Show all publications
Ivarsson, A., Johnson, U. & Edvardsson, A. (2015). Psychologically based programs for injury prevention in football: a meta-analysis. In: Jens Bangsbo and Peter Krustrup (Ed.), Program and Abstracts: 8th World Congress on Science and Football Copenhagen, Denmark, 20-23 May, 2015. Paper presented at 8th World Congress on Science and Football, Copenhagen, Denmark, 20-23 May, 2015 (pp. 69-70). Copenhagen: The WCSF2015 Scientific Committee
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychologically based programs for injury prevention in football: a meta-analysis
2015 (English)In: Program and Abstracts: 8th World Congress on Science and Football Copenhagen, Denmark, 20-23 May, 2015 / [ed] Jens Bangsbo and Peter Krustrup, Copenhagen: The WCSF2015 Scientific Committee , 2015, p. 69-70Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Several studies have found that stress increases the risk for sport injuries. It is therefore suggested that psychologically based intervention programs, targeting perceived stress, could decrease injury risk. The objective of the study, using a meta-analysis procedure, was to evaluate the effect of psychologically based interventions, performed in football populations and based on documented injury rates. A literature search founded on the electronic databases; PsycINFO, Web of Science, Web of Knowledge, PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scholar were examined using combinations of key words, such as ‘sports injury’, ‘psychology’, ‘intervention’ ‘prevention’ ‘soccer’ and ‘football’. The literature review resulted in three studies that together contained 100 participants. The interventions were based on different approaches such as mindfulness, and mental skills training. All studies, included in the analysis, reported fewer injuries for the experimental groups in comparison to the control groups (Cohen’s d effect sizes 0.89, 0.59, and 1.27). The overall results correspond to a Cohen’s d effect size of 0.86, p <.001, (95 % CI 0.44-1.28). The result indicated that psychologically based intervention programs have potential to decrease the risk of sport injuries in football populations. These results are in line with intervention studies performed within others sports (e.g. floorball). One reason for the effectiveness of the intervention could be that all three were offering stress management education. Because sport injuries have a negative impact on athletes, teams and communities, athletes are recommended to work with psychological training programs as a part of their injury prevention work. © The WCSF2015 Scientific Committee

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen: The WCSF2015 Scientific Committee, 2015
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-28603 (URN)978-87-9177-159-0 (ISBN)
Conference
8th World Congress on Science and Football, Copenhagen, Denmark, 20-23 May, 2015
Available from: 2015-06-16 Created: 2015-06-16 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Edvardsson, A., Ivarsson, A. & Johnson, U. (2012). Is a cognitive-behavioural biofeedback intervention useful to reduce injury risk in junior football players?. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (JSSM), 11(2), 331-338
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is a cognitive-behavioural biofeedback intervention useful to reduce injury risk in junior football players?
2012 (English)In: Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (JSSM), ISSN 1303-2968, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 331-338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Athletes participating in sport are exposed to a relatively high injury risk. Previous research has suggested that it could be possible to reduce sports injuries through psychological skills training. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which a cognitive behavioural biofeedback intervention could reduce the number of sports injuries in a sample of players in Swedish elite football high schools. Participants from four elite football high schools (16-19 years old) were divided into one experiment (n = 13) and one control group (n = 14). Participants were asked to complete three questionnaires to assess anxiety level (Sport Anxiety Scale), history of stressors (Life Event Scale for Collegiate Athletes) and coping skills (Athletic Coping Skills Inventory - 28) in a baseline measure. Mann-Whitney Utests showed no significant differences in pre-intervention scores based on the questionnaires. The experimental group participated in a nine-week intervention period consisting of seven sessions, including: somatic relaxation, thought stopping, emotions/problem focused coping, goal setting, biofeedback training as well as keeping a critical incident diary. A Mann-Whitney U test showed no significant difference between the control and experimental group U (n1 = 13, n2 = 14) = 51.00, p = 0.054. However, considering the small sample, the statistical power (0.05 for present study), to detect effects was low. The results of the study are discussed from a psychological perspective and proposals for future research are given. © Journal of Sports Science and Medicine.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bursa, Turkey: Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 2012
Keywords
Coping skills, elite sport, psychological injury prevention, psychological stress, soccer
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-17778 (URN)000304677100017 ()24149207 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84861970147 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-05-31 Created: 2012-05-31 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
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