hh.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Forsberg, Elenita
Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Ziegert, K. & Forsberg, E. (2019). “The happiness with dancing give power to life”: Qualitative analysis of Dance for Parkinson with a salutogenic perspective. In: The international fields of arts, health and wellbeing: . Paper presented at Nordic Arts and Health Conference, Malmö, Sweden, 21st May, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“The happiness with dancing give power to life”: Qualitative analysis of Dance for Parkinson with a salutogenic perspective
2019 (English)In: The international fields of arts, health and wellbeing, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39503 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Arts and Health Conference, Malmö, Sweden, 21st May, 2019
Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-05-29Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, E., Bäcklund, B., Hjort-Telhede, E. & Karlsson, S. (2019). Virtual Patient Cases for Active Student Participation in Nursing Education — Students’ Learning Experiences. Creative Education, 10(7), 1475-1491
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Virtual Patient Cases for Active Student Participation in Nursing Education — Students’ Learning Experiences
2019 (English)In: Creative Education, ISSN 2151-4755, E-ISSN 2151-4771, Vol. 10, no 7, p. 1475-1491Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Virtual Patient cases (VP cases) promote learning, teaching, and assessment of clinical reasoning and can stimulate and motivate active learning experiences in nursing education. The aim of the study was to investigate the use of VP cases for active student participation in nursing education regarding students’ learning experiences of clinical reasoning. After an intervention using VP cases in the graduate nursing program, 174 evaluation questionnaires were collected from the students. The questionnaire consisted of open-ended questions that covered students’ learning experiences using VP cases. Deductive content analysis was used with a focus on the students’ learning experiences. The results showed that the use of the VP cases provided a comprehensive view of the patient and encouraged the students to broaden their thinking and helped them in drawing conclusions and in structuring their problem-solving. The VP cases also stimulated their learning process and reflection. Their knowledge was challenged, and this motivated them to search for more knowledge that was then followed up in the VP cases. The students found that the VP cases provided support in translating theoretical knowledge into clinical reasoning, and they facilitated the application of theory in practice and encouraged the students to use their clinical reasoning. The VP cases allowed for self-evaluation, which was a motivating force and increased their awareness of their abilities for clinical reasoning. Learning experiences from VP cases seem to be applicable in higher education and seem especially useful in enabling nursing students to apply theory in their clinical practice. Experiential learning theory supports the learning experiences from VP cases in clinical reasoning. In addition, working with VP cases seems to promote active student participation. Copyright © 2019 by author(s) and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Irvine, CA: Scientific Research Publishing, 2019
Keywords
Virtual Patient, Active Student Participation, Nursing Education, Learning Experiences, Clinical Reasoning
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40385 (URN)10.4236/ce.2019.107108 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, E. & Rasmusson, K. (2018). Using academic reflection for examination in simulated environment. Paper presented at 3rd World Congress on Nursing Education, Practice & Research, May 16-17, 2018, Montreal, Canada. Journal of Nursing & Care, 7, 53-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using academic reflection for examination in simulated environment
2018 (English)In: Journal of Nursing & Care, ISSN 2167-1168, Vol. 7, p. 53-53Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In nursing education, in semester four of six, in the course of 10 weeks clinical practice the final individual exam has developed. The aim was to deepen the clinical reasoning and make it more visible. The aim was also to give the student the possibility to reflect on the learning objectives, to identify additional knowledge needs and progression, which is a kind of learning recommended by higher education in Sweden. The academic reflection should have a clear purpose and show evidence of learning. Such a reflection requires that the student can use theory from the education to describe, explain and discuss critical events and their importance to future professional practice.

 Two classes with 75 nursing students participated in the study. One pair of students conducted a complex scenario in simulated environment during one hour including feedback. Another pair observed the scenario for identifying clinical reasoning, patient safety and team work. Then the pairs changed roles. Afterwards the students were instructed to make an academic reflection on their learning and progression based on seven open questions in a learning platform survey. Qualitative content analysis was used for data analysis.

Students expressed that the scenarios trained the ability to manage acute situations, team communication, plan and prioritize nursing actions and prepare for future profession.

The students felt that it was an excellent form of examination as the academic reflection forced the student to be aware of individual strengths and weaknesses and on the basis of this identify lack of knowledge.© 2018 OMICS International

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Henderson: OMICS International, 2018
Keywords
academic reflection, examination, nursing, simulation
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37037 (URN)10.4172/2167-1168-C3-070 (DOI)
Conference
3rd World Congress on Nursing Education, Practice & Research, May 16-17, 2018, Montreal, Canada
Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-14Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, E., Bäcklund, B., Hjort-Telhede, E. & Karlsson, S. (2018). Virtual patient cases for active student participation in nursing education. Paper presented at 3rd World Congress on Nursing Education, Practice & Research, May 16-17, 2018, Montreal, Canada. Journal of Nursing & Care, 7, 63-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Virtual patient cases for active student participation in nursing education
2018 (English)In: Journal of Nursing & Care, ISSN 2167-1168, Vol. 7, p. 63-63Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A didactive method which promote a more active student participation (ASP), Virtual Patient (VP) cases  may be a valuable intervention. VP cases are defined as interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios for healthcare education. VP cases are excellent for training clinical reasoning skills.

The aim of the study was to investigate utilization of VP cases for ASP in nursing education, regarding student’s learning experience.

The design was an intervention study, 58 students in the third semester of six in the nursing program were included in the study. In 2016-2017, interventions have been conducted in the Human Biomedicine course with the purpose to develop a course concept that included didactic methods that promoted ASP. The students performed four VP cases individually at home. Before solving  the VP cases, the students had lectures in medicine science for example concerning chest organs diseases. In order to be a complement to that lecture the VP case was about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The lectures were followed up with seminars where the students were able to ask questions regarding conducted VP cases. After each performed VP case, the student answered a self -evaluation form with open ended questions.  Data was conducted using content analysis.

The result showed that the students found the VP cases challenging and motivational. The VPs taught them to think wide and stimulated to search for more knowledge. Finally they thought it was a good way to test themselves and appreciated the direct feedback, lack of knowledge became visible at once. © 2018 OMICS International

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Henderson: OMICS International, 2018
Keywords
Virtual Patiens, nursing, active student participation
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37039 (URN)10.4172/2167-1168-C3-071 (DOI)
Conference
3rd World Congress on Nursing Education, Practice & Research, May 16-17, 2018, Montreal, Canada
Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-14Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, E., Ziegert, K., Hult, H. & Fors, U. (2016). Assessing progression of clinical reasoning through virtual patients: An exploratory study. Nurse Education in Practice, 16(1), 97-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing progression of clinical reasoning through virtual patients: An exploratory study
2016 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 97-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To avoid test-driven learning, there have been discussions regarding the use of more formative assessments in health care education to promote students' deep learning. Feedback is important in formative assessment, but many students ignore it; therefore, interventions should be introduced which stimulate them to reflect on the new knowledge.

The aim for this study was to explore if Virtual Patient (VP)-based formative assessments, in connection with self-evaluations, had an impact on postgraduate pediatric nursing students' development of clinical reasoning abilities. Students' self-evaluations served as the basis for measuring progress. Data was analysed using deductive content analysis.

The findings showed a clear progression of the clinical reasoning ability of the students. After the first assessment, the students described feelings of uncertainty and that their knowledge gaps were exposed. At the mid-course assessment the awareness of improved clinical reasoning was obvious and the students were more certain of knowing how to solve the VP cases. In the final assessment, self-efficacy was expressed.

VP-based assessments, in connection with self-evaluations, early in the education resulted in a gain of students' own identification of the concept of clinical reasoning, awareness of what to focus on during clinical practice and visualised expected clinical competence. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kidlington: Churchill Livingstone, 2016
Keywords
Clinical reasoning, Formative assessment, Postgraduate pediatric nurse education, Virtual patients
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-30008 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2015.09.006 (DOI)000370769000016 ()26482401 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84951856464 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-11 Created: 2015-12-11 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, E. & Fors, U. (2015). Educational impacts of changed action of using VPs in postgraduate nurse education. In: : . Paper presented at 4th International Conference on Nursing and Healthcare, San Francisco, CA, USA, 5-7 October, 2015 (pp. 150-150). Los Angeles, CA: OMICS Publishing Group, 4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Educational impacts of changed action of using VPs in postgraduate nurse education
2015 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A meta-analysis of a thesis project entitled Virtual Patients (VPs) for Assessment of Clinical Reasoning has been performed.  VPs are interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios for the purpose of healthcare education and assessment. To teach and learn clinical reasoning (CR) can be hard because its complexity and difficulty to make it visible for students. VPs have been found to improve learning and be superior to traditional teaching methods for training CR.  Most VP systems have the potential to track all interactions of the user and therefore recommended for assessment.

The aim of the meta-analysis, which is based on the research project’s four studies, was to reach a deeper understanding of the educational impact of using VPs in postgraduate pediatric nurse education.  Data was collected during 2008-2013. The first study evaluated the applicability and students’ acceptance of VP-based exams. Through thinking aloud the second study identified how clinically experienced nurses solved complex VP cases which was a base for the third study; evaluating a new scoring model for VP-based exams. Finally the last study explored if formative VP-based assessments in connection with self-evaluations had an impact on student’s development of CR and if they could detect their progression.

For the meta-analysis, concepts of challenge, skills, novice and expert have been applied. The findings shows that VP-based assessments have high educational impacts: for example even if the students were novices in the domain of Child health care, the early exposure for formative VP-based assessments gave them an insight about what is required to work at such a unit as well as a stimulation to develop CR in this field. They became aware of what to focus on in literature and clinical practice. The students reported a perceived progression of CR ability from uncertainty about the competence, to self-efficacy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Los Angeles, CA: OMICS Publishing Group, 2015
Series
Journal of Nursing & Care, ISSN 2167-1168 ; 5
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-28642 (URN)10.4172/2167-1168.C1.014 (DOI)
Conference
4th International Conference on Nursing and Healthcare, San Francisco, CA, USA, 5-7 October, 2015
Available from: 2015-06-18 Created: 2015-06-18 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, E., Ziegert, K., Hult, H. & Fors, U. (2015). Evaluation of a novel scoring and grading model for VP-based exams in postgraduate nurse education. Nurse Education Today, 35(12), 1246-1251
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of a novel scoring and grading model for VP-based exams in postgraduate nurse education
2015 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1246-1251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For Virtual Patient-based exams, several scoring and grading methods have been proposed, but none have yet been validated. The aim of this study was to evaluate a new scoring and grading model for VP-based exams in postgraduate paediatric nurse education.The same student group of 19 students performed a VP-based exam in three consecutive courses. When using the scoring and grading assessment model, which contains a deduction system for unnecessary or unwanted actions, a progression was found in the three courses: 53% of the students passed the first exam, 63% the second and 84% passed the final exam. The most common reason for deduction of points was due to students asking too many interview questions or ordering too many laboratory tests.The results showed that the new scoring model made it possible to judge the students' clinical reasoning process as well as their progress. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kidlington: Churchill Livingstone, 2015
Keywords
Assessment, Postgraduate nursing education, Scoring and grading, Virtual Patient-based exams
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-28641 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2015.04.005 (DOI)000365372700018 ()25979799 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84946490324 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-06-18 Created: 2015-06-18 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, E., Ziegert, K., Hult, H. & Fors, U. (2014). Assessing progression of clinical reasoning through Virtual Patients. In: Ottawa Conference Abstracts: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: April 25-29, 2014: Transforming Healthcare through Excellence and Evaluation: 16th Ottawa Conference: 12th Canadian Conference on Medical Education. Paper presented at Transforming Healthcare through Excellence in Assessment and Evaluation, 16th Ottawa Conference, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, April 25-29, 2014 (pp. 71-72).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing progression of clinical reasoning through Virtual Patients
2014 (English)In: Ottawa Conference Abstracts: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: April 25-29, 2014: Transforming Healthcare through Excellence and Evaluation: 16th Ottawa Conference: 12th Canadian Conference on Medical Education, 2014, p. 71-72Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background

There have been discussions to use more formative assessments in health care education to contribute to students’ deep learning. Feedback is important, but a lot of student’s do not do anything with it. Thus, interventions which force students to reflect the new knowledge need to be introduced.

In order to explore if formative VP-based exams had an impact on development of clinical reasoning ability and achievement of clinical decision making, we let postgraduate pediatric nurse students complete self-evaluation forms in connection with three VP- based assessments to follow their progress.

Summary of Work

After performed assessment and before answering the self-evaluation form, the students’ were asked to take part of the feedback section of the VP-system and the recommended interactions in the VP system. Data was conducted using content analysis with a deductive approach. Kolb’s’ model of Learning Cycle guided the analysis.

Summary of Results

The result showed a perceived progression of clinical reasoning skills by the students. After the first assessment the students described uncertainty and that knowledge gaps were exposed, at the second exam the awareness of clinical reasoning was obvious and the students were more certain of knowing how. Finally, self-efficacy in patient solving was expressed.

Conclusions

VP-based assessments with self-evaluation early in the education resulted in a gain of students’ own identification of the concept of clinical reasoning, awareness of what to focus on, and pay attention to during clinical practice.

Take-home Messages

VP with reflective tools is excellent to use in formative assessments to identify progress and to visualize the expected clinical competence.

National Category
Learning Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-24244 (URN)
Conference
Transforming Healthcare through Excellence in Assessment and Evaluation, 16th Ottawa Conference, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, April 25-29, 2014
Available from: 2013-12-30 Created: 2013-12-30 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, E., Ziegert, K., Hult, H. & Fors, U. (2013). Clinical reasoning in nursing, a think-aloud study using virtual patients – A base for an innovative assessment. Nurse Education Today, 34(4), 538-542
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical reasoning in nursing, a think-aloud study using virtual patients – A base for an innovative assessment
2013 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 538-542Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In health-care education, it is important to assess the competencies that are essential for the professional role. To develop clinical reasoning skills is crucial fornursing practice and therefore an important learning outcome in nursing education programmes. Virtual patients (VPs) are interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios and have been suggested for use not only for learning, but also for assessment of clinical reasoning. The aim of this study was to investigate how experienced paediatric nurses reason regarding complex VP cases and how they make clinical decisions. The study was also aimed to give information about possible issues that should be assessed in clinical reasoning exams for post-graduate students in diploma specialist paediatric nursing education. The information from this study is believed to be of high value when developing scoring and grading models for a VP-based examination for the specialist diploma in paediatricnursing education. Using the think-aloud method, data were collected from 30 RNs working in Swedish paediatric departments, and child or school health-care centres. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. The results indicate that experienced nurses try to consolidate their hypotheses by seeing a pattern and judging the value of signs, symptoms, physical examinations, laboratory tests and radiology. They show high specific competence but earlier experience of similar cases was also of importance for the decision making. The nurses thought it was an innovative assessment focusing on clinical reasoning and clinical decision making. They thought it was an enjoyable way to be assessed and that all three main issues could be assessed using VPs. In conclusion, VPs seem to be a possible model for assessing the clinical reasoning process and clinical decision making, but how to score and grade such exams needs further research. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Assessment, Content analysis, Paediatric nursing, Think-aloud, Virtual patients
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-24245 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2013.07.010 (DOI)000333781600011 ()23938093 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84895136430 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-12-30 Created: 2013-12-30 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Fors, U., Forsberg, E. & Gunning, W. (2012). Can virtual patients be used to assess clinical reasoning? The effect of different grading metrics. In: 15th Ottawa Conference, Abstracts: . Paper presented at The 15th Ottawa Conference: Assessment of Competence in Medicine and the Healthcare Professions, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 9-13 March, 2012 (pp. 166-166). Ottawa: AMEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can virtual patients be used to assess clinical reasoning? The effect of different grading metrics
2012 (English)In: 15th Ottawa Conference, Abstracts, Ottawa: AMEE , 2012, p. 166-166Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background

Virtual patients (VPs) can be used to assess clinical reasoning. Grading metrics applied to VP exams may include scoring for appropriate differential diagnoses, proposed therapy, and the learner’s approach to the case. The learner’s inquiry of medical history, physical exam, and lab/ancillary tests utilized during the exam can all be graded.  However, the best grading metric used to assess clinical reasoning for VP examination is unresolved. 

Summary of Work

Results from two groups of students assessed by VP-based examination (n>300) were used as a basis to evaluate different grading metrics. These grading models were also compared with results of other traditional student examination performance. 

Summary of Results

Each method of grading had both pronounced advantages and disadvantages with none considered ideal. However one grading metric was perceived to perform slightly better. None of the scoring methods had a direct correlation with four traditional exam formats to which they were compared. 

Conclusions

Each grading metric used in this study had advantages and disadvantages. Medical school exams employing VP-based exams need to define what should be assessed for reliable utilization.

Take-home Messages

Objectives of VP-based examination are essential to measure learner competency in an appropriate context. Traditional exams do not necessarily measure the same aptitude that VP-based exams measure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ottawa: AMEE, 2012
National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-19638 (URN)
Conference
The 15th Ottawa Conference: Assessment of Competence in Medicine and the Healthcare Professions, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 9-13 March, 2012
Available from: 2012-09-17 Created: 2012-09-17 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications