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Fridlund, Bengt
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Morténius, H., Hildingh, C. & Fridlund, B. (2016). Strategic Communication Intervention to Stimulate Interest in Research and Evidence-Based Practice: A 12-Year Follow-Up Study With Registered Nurses. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 13(1), 42-49
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategic Communication Intervention to Stimulate Interest in Research and Evidence-Based Practice: A 12-Year Follow-Up Study With Registered Nurses
2016 (English)In: Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, ISSN 1545-102X, E-ISSN 1741-6787, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 42-49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Bridging the research–practice gap is a challenge for health care. Fostering awareness of and interest in research and development (R & D) can serve as a platform to help nurses and others bridge this gap. Strategic communication is an interdisciplinary field that has been used to achieve long-term interest in adopting and applying R & D in primary care.

Aim

The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of a strategic communication intervention on long-term interest in R & D among primary care staff members (PCSMs) in general and registered nurses (RNs) in particular.

Methods

This prospective intervention study included all members of the PCSMs, including RNs, in a Swedish primary care area. The interest of PCSMs in R & D was measured on two occasions, at 7 and 12 years, using both bivariate and multivariate tests.

Results

A total of 99.5% of RNs gained awareness of R & D after the first 7 years of intervention versus 95% of the remaining PCSMs (p = .004). A comparison of the two measurements ascertained stability and improvement of interest in R & D among RNs, compared with all other PCSMs (odds ratio 1.81; confidence interval 1.08–3.06). Moreover, the RNs who did become interested in R & D also demonstrated increased intention to adopt innovative thinking in their work over time (p = .005).

Linking Evidence to Action

RNs play an important role in reducing the gap between theory and practice. Strategic communication was a significant tool for inspiring interest in R & D. Application of this platform to generate interest in R & D is a unique intervention and should be recognized for future interventions in primary care. Positive attitudes toward R & D may reinforce the use of evidence-based practice in health care, thereby making a long-term contribution to the patient benefit. © 2015 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
Keywords
communication, dissemination, research-to-practice gap, intervention, primary care, registered nurses, R & D interest
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-29817 (URN)10.1111/wvn.12109 (DOI)26462140 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84958153835 (Scopus ID)
Note

Special Issue on Interventions and Leader Role in EBP; This work was supported by the Department of Research, Development and Education, Region Halland, Sweden.

Available from: 2015-11-25 Created: 2015-11-25 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Wieslander, I., Mårtensson, J., Fridlund, B. & Svedberg, P. (2016). Women’s experiences of how their recovery process is promoted after a first myocardial infarction: Implications for cardiac rehabilitation care. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 11, Article ID 30633.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Women’s experiences of how their recovery process is promoted after a first myocardial infarction: Implications for cardiac rehabilitation care
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 30633Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A rapid improvement in the care of myocardial infarction (MI) in the emergency services has been witnessed in recent years. There is, however, a lack of understanding of the factors involved in a successful recovery process, after the initial stages of emergency care among patients, and in particular those who are women. Both preventive and promotive perspectives should be taken into consideration for facilitating the recovery process of women after a MI.

Aim: To explore how women’s recovery processes are promoted after a first MI.

Methods: A qualitative content analysis was used.

Findings: The women’s recovery process is a multidirectional process with a desire to develop and approach a new perspective on life. The women’s possibility to approach new perspectives on life incorporates how they handle the three dimensions: behaviour, that is, women’s acting and engaging in various activities; social, that is, how women receive and give support in their social environment; and psychological, that is, their way of thinking, reflecting, and appreciating life.

Conclusions: The personal recovery of women is a multidirectional process with a desire to develop and approach a new perspective on life. It is important for cardiac rehabilitation nurses to not only focus on lifestyle changes and social support but also on working actively with the women’s inner strength in order to promote the recovery of the women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jäfälla: Co-Action Publishing, 2016
Keywords
myocardial infarction, promotion, qualitative content analysis, recovery process, women
National Category
Nursing Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-30732 (URN)10.3402/qhw.v11.30633 (DOI)000396164600001 ()2-s2.0-84982698563 (Scopus ID)
Note

This study was supported by research grants from The Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation, The Swedish Heart and Lung Association, and The Swedish Society of Nursing.

Available from: 2016-04-12 Created: 2016-04-12 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Larsson, I., Fridlund, B., Arvidsson, B., Teleman, A., Svedberg, P. & Bergman, S. (2015). A nurse-led rheumatology clinic versus rheumatologist-led clinic in monitoring of patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis undergoing biological therapy: a cost comparison study in a randomised controlled trial. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 16, Article ID 354.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A nurse-led rheumatology clinic versus rheumatologist-led clinic in monitoring of patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis undergoing biological therapy: a cost comparison study in a randomised controlled trial
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2015 (English)In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 16, article id 354Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Recommendations for rheumatology nursing management of chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIA) from European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) states that nurses should take part in the monitoring patients’ disease and therapy in order to achieve cost savings. The aim of the study was to compare the costs of rheumatology care between a nurse-led rheumatology clinic (NLC), based on person-centred care (PCC), versus a rheumatologist-led clinic (RLC), in monitoring of patients with CIA undergoing biological therapy.

Methods: Patients with CIA undergoing biological therapy (n = 107) and a Disease Activity Score of 28 ≤ 3.2 were randomised to follow-up by either NLC or RLC. All patients met the rheumatologist at inclusion and after 12 months. In the intervention one of two annual monitoring visits in an RLC was replaced by a visit to an NLC. The primary outcome was total annual cost of rheumatology care.

Results: A total of 97 patients completed the RCT at the 12 month follow-up. Replacing one of the two annual rheumatologist monitoring visits by a nurse-led monitoring visit, resulted in no additional contacts to the rheumatology clinic, but rather a decrease in the use of resources and a reduction of costs. The total annual rheumatology care costs including fixed monitoring, variable monitoring, rehabilitation, specialist consultations, radiography, and pharmacological therapy, generated €14107.7 per patient in the NLC compared with €16274.9 in the RCL (p = 0.004), giving a €2167.2 (13 %) lower annual cost for the NLC.

Conclusions: Patients with CIA and low disease activity or in remission undergoing biological therapy can be monitored with a reduced resource use and at a lower annual cost by an NLC, based on PCC with no difference in clinical outcomes. This could free resources for more intensive monitoring of patients early in the disease or patients with high disease activity.

Trial registration: The trial is registered as a clinical trial at the ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01071447). Registration date: October 8, 2009.

© 2015 Larsson et al.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2015
Keywords
Biological therapy, Chronic inflammatory arthritis, Cost comparison, Person-centred care, Nurse-led
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-29853 (URN)10.1186/s12891-015-0817-6 (DOI)000364807600002 ()26573936 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84946882419 (Scopus ID)
Note

This research was supported by the Swedish Association of Health Professionals, the Swedish Rheumatism Association, Region Halland and the Inger Bendix Foundation for Medical Research.

Available from: 2015-12-01 Created: 2015-12-01 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Larsson, I., Fridlund, B., Arvidsson, B., Teleman, A. & Bergman, S. (2014). Biological therapy can be monitored more cost effectively by a nurse-led rheumatology clinic. Paper presented at EULAR (The European League Against Rheumatism) Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, Paris, France, 11-14 June, 2014. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 72, Suppl. 3, 139-140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biological therapy can be monitored more cost effectively by a nurse-led rheumatology clinic
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2014 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 72, Suppl. 3, p. 139-140Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIA) treated with biological therapy are usually monitored by rheumatologists. Research shows that a nurse-led rheumatology clinic is safe and effective in monitoring biological therapy (1) and contributed added value in patients within rheumatology care, because the encounter with the nurse led to a sense of security, familiarity and participation (2).

Objectives: To compare the cost of monitoring biological therapy in a nurse-led rheumatology clinic with those of a rheumatologist-led clinic in patients with low disease activity or in remission.

Methods: Cost comparison was based on data from a 12 month randomised controlled trial (1). A total of 107 patients were randomly assigned to either a rheumatologist-led clinic or to a nurse-led rheumatology clinic. The purpose of the intervention was to replace one of two annual monitoring visits at the rheumatologist-led clinic (control group; n=54) by a visit to a nurse-led rheumatology clinic (intervention group; n=53), based on person-centred care. Inclusion criteria were ongoing biological therapy and Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28) ≤3.2. All patients met the rheumatologist at inclusion and after 12 months. All outpatient visits, team rehabilitation and all the telephone advice at the Rheumatology Clinic were registered for the patients who participated in the trial. Main outcome measures were direct costs related to rheumatology care during the 12 month follow-up period.

Results: After 12 months 97 patients completed the study. At the inclusion the patients had mean age of 55.4 years, disease duration of 16.7 years, and DAS28 was 2.1, with no significant differences between the two groups. There was no mean difference in changes in clinical outcome between the two groups (DAS28 -0.06; p=0.66). The total annual cost of team rehabilitation in rheumatology care, per patient monitored by the nurse-led rheumatology clinic was €580 compared with €1278 for monitoring by a rheumatologist-led clinic, translating in a €698 (55%) lower annual cost. The annual cost of just the outpatient rheumatology care provided by rheumatologist and rheumatology nurse, per patient was €457 for monitoring by the nurse-led rheumatology clinic compared with €598 for monitoring by a rheumatologist-led clinic, translating in a €141 (24%) lower annual cost.

Conclusions: Patients with stable CIA undergoing biological therapy can be monitored more cost effectively by a nurse-led rheumatology clinic compared to a rheumatologist-led clinic, with no difference in clinical outcome as measured by DAS28.

References

  1. Larsson et al. (2014). Randomized controlled trial of a nurse-led rheumatology clinic for monitoring biological therapy. J Adv Nurs, 70(1): 164-175.
  2. Larsson et al. (2012). Patients’ experiences of a nurse-led rheumatology clinic in Sweden – a qualitative study in patients undergoing biological therapy. Nurs Health Sci, 14(4): 501-507.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMJ Books, 2014
Keywords
Biological therapy, cost comparison, nurse-led rheumatology clinic, randomised controlled trial
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-27094 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-eular.3805 (DOI)000346919800424 ()
Conference
EULAR (The European League Against Rheumatism) Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, Paris, France, 11-14 June, 2014
Available from: 2014-11-20 Created: 2014-11-20 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Wieslander, I., Fridlund, B., Mårtensson, J. & Svedberg, P. (2013). Cardiac Rehabilitation Nurses’ Experiences of Factors Influencing Female Patients’ Recovery After Their First Myocardial Infarction. In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing: . Paper presented at EuroHeartCare 2013 Congress, Glasgow, United Kingdom, March 22-23, 2013 (pp. S77-S78). London: Sage Publications, 12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiac Rehabilitation Nurses’ Experiences of Factors Influencing Female Patients’ Recovery After Their First Myocardial Infarction
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, London: Sage Publications, 2013, Vol. 12, p. S77-S78Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Secondary prevention care after a Myocardial Infarction (MI) has not improved during the last 15 years at the same rate as acute MI care. One reason could be that research and health care focus more on treatment, symptoms and risk factors and not on the individuals’ perceptions of the recovery process after an MI. Most previous research focuses on recovery from the women’s and their partners’ point of view. Since cardiac rehabilitation nurses meet many women after MI, their experiences of the women’s recovery process may be an important complement perspective.

Purpose

The aim was to explore cardiac rehabilitation nurses’ experiences of factors influencing female patients’ recovery after their first MI.

Method

The study was conducted using qualitative content analysis. Twenty cardiac rehabilitation nurses were interviewed and the study was carried out at 10 hospitals in Sweden.

Conclusions

Cardiac rehabilitation nurses experienced that women’s recovery after an MI was influenced by factors that were both related to their own individual as well as by their surroundings factors. The underlying meaning of women´s recovery is characterized as the transition process to the recovery to health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2013
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-21913 (URN)000328735000150 ()
Conference
EuroHeartCare 2013 Congress, Glasgow, United Kingdom, March 22-23, 2013
Note

Vol. 12, Suppl. 1, Abstract 204

Available from: 2013-05-06 Created: 2013-04-30 Last updated: 2018-07-09Bibliographically approved
Arvidsson, S., Bergman, S., Arvidsson, B., Fridlund, B. & Tingström, P. (2013). Effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning programme in people with rheumatic diseases: a randomized controlled study. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 69(7), 1500-1514
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning programme in people with rheumatic diseases: a randomized controlled study
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 1500-1514Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To evaluate the effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning programme for people with rheumatic diseases in terms of health-related quality of life, empowerment, and self-care ability.

Background: Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis express a great need for education and support in adapting to the disease, but the average qualities of studies about patient education interventions are not high. There is no evidence of long-term benefits of patient education.

Design: Randomized controlled trial.

Methods: A randomized controlled design was selected with test at baseline, 1-week and 6-month post-interventions after completed the 1-year programme. The tests consisted of validity and reliability tested instruments. The participants were randomly assigned in spring 2009 to either the experimental group (n = 54) or the control group (n = 148). The programme was running alongside the standard care the participants received at a rheumatology unit. Parametric and non-parametric tests were used in the analyses.

Results: The participants in the experimental group had statistically significant stronger empowerment after participation in the self-care promoting problem-based learning programme compared with the control group, at the 6-month post-intervention. Approximately, two-thirds of the participants in the experimental group stated that they had implemented lifestyle changes due to the programme.

Conclusion: The self-care promoting problem-based learning programme enabled people with rheumatic diseases to improve their empowerment compared with the control group. It is important to continue to develop problem-based learning in patient education to find the very best way to use this pedagogical method in rheumatology care. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
Keywords
empowerment, nursing, patient education, problem-based learning, rheumatic diseases, self-care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-20653 (URN)10.1111/jan.12008 (DOI)000319829000006 ()22973890 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84878623956 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: The Swedish Rheumatism Association, the Region Halland, the South Regional Health Care Committee, the Stig Thunes Foundation Fund for Health Care Research, the Norrbacka-Eugenia Foundation, the Association of Rheumatology Nurses in Sweden, and the Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases.

Available from: 2013-01-10 Created: 2013-01-10 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Wieslander, I., Mårtensson, J., Fridlund, B. & Svedberg, P. (2013). Factors influencing female patients’ recovery after their first myocardial infarction as experienced by cardiac rehabilitation nurses. Open Journal of Nursing, 3(2), 230-240
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors influencing female patients’ recovery after their first myocardial infarction as experienced by cardiac rehabilitation nurses
2013 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 230-240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In the developed part of the world, coro- nary heart disease is the major cause of death and is one of the leading causes of disease burden. In Swe- den, more than 30,000 people per year are affected by myocardial infarction and out of these approximately 40% are women. Nearly 70% of the women survive and after a myocardial infarction a recovery process follows. Today’s health care focuses more on treat- ment, symptoms and risk factors than on the indi- viduals’ perceptions of the recovery process. Aim: To explore cardiac rehabilitation nurses’ experiences of factors influencing female patients’ recovery after their first myocardial infarction. Methods: Twenty cardiac rehabilitation nurses were interviewed. The study was conducted using qualitative content analy- sis. Results: The cardiac rehabilitation nurses experi- enced that women’s recovery after a first myocardial infarction was influenced whether they had a suppor- tive context, their ability to cope with the stresses of life, if they wanted to be involved in their own per- sonal care and how they related to themselves. Con- clusions: Women’s recovery after a myocardial in- farction was influenced by factors related to sur- roundings as well as own individual factors. The un- derlying meaning of women’s recovery can be de- scribed as the transition process of a recovery to health. Our findings suggest that a focus on person- centered nursing would be beneficial in order to promote the every woman’s personal and unique re- covery after a myocardial infarction. Finally, the car- diac rehabilitation nurses’ experiences of factors influencing male patients’ recovery after their first myo- cardial infarction should be important to investigate. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Irvine, CA: Scientific Research Publishing, 2013
Keywords
Cardiac Rehabilitation Nurses; Myocardial Infarction; Recovery; Transition Process; Women
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-24101 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2013.32032 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-12-06 Created: 2013-12-06 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Wieslander, I., Fridlund, B., Mårtensson, J. & Svedberg, P. (2013). Female patients' recovery after their first myocardial infarction. In: : . Paper presented at Svenska Kardiovaskulära Vårmötet, Göteborg, Sverige, 17-19 april, 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Female patients' recovery after their first myocardial infarction
2013 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Secondary prevention care after a Myocardial Infarction (MI) has not improved during the last 15 years at the same rate as acute MI care. One reason could be that research and health care focus more on treatment, symptoms and risk factors and not on the individuals’ perceptions of the recovery process after an MI. Most previous research focuses on recovery from the women’s and their partners’ point of view. Since cardiac rehabilitation nurses meet many women after MI, their experiences of the women’s recovery process may be an important complement perspective.

Purpose

The aim was to explore cardiac rehabilitation nurses’ experiences of factors influencing female patients’ recovery after their first MI.

Method

The study was conducted using qualitative content analysis. Twenty cardiac rehabilitation nurses were interviewed and the study was carried out at 10 hospitals in Sweden.

Conclusions

Cardiac rehabilitation nurses experienced that women’s recovery after an MI was influenced by factors that were both related to their own individual as well as by their surroundings factors. The underlying meaning of women´s recovery is characterized as the transition process to the recovery to health.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-21788 (URN)
Conference
Svenska Kardiovaskulära Vårmötet, Göteborg, Sverige, 17-19 april, 2013
Available from: 2013-04-23 Created: 2013-04-23 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Larsson, I., Fridlund, B., Arvidsson, B. & Bergman, S. (2012). Biological therapy could be monitored by a rheumatology nurse-led clinic without any differences in outcome – a randomised controlled study. In: : . Paper presented at The first World Congress on Debates & Consensus in Bone, Muscle and Joint Diseases (BMJD), The Academy for Clinical Debates & Controversies in Medicine, Barcelona, Spain, 19-22 January, 2012.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biological therapy could be monitored by a rheumatology nurse-led clinic without any differences in outcome – a randomised controlled study
2012 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: Patients with rheumatic diseases treated with biological therapy are usually followed up by rheumatologists. Nurse-led rheumatology clinics have been proposed for patients who are in low disease activity or remission.

Objectives: To compare treatment outcomes from a nurse-led rheumatology clinic and a rheumatologist clinic for patients treated with biological therapy with low disease activity or in remission.

Methods: In a prospective controlled study 107 patients were randomised into two groups with six months follow up to a rheumatology nurse (intervention group; n=53) or to a rheumatologist (control group; n=54). Inclusion criteria were ongoing biological therapy and Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28) ≤3.2. All patients met the rheumatologist at inclusion and after 12 months. In the nurse-led rheumatology clinic the patients´ disease activity was assessed by examination of tender or swollen joints and laboratory tests. The rheumatology nurse also had a dialogue concerning the patient’s needs with regard to drug therapy, smoking habits and psychosocial aspects. After 12 months 97 patients completed the study. Main outcome was disease activity measured by DAS28.

Results: Patients had mean age of 55.4 years and disease duration of 16.7 years. DAS28 was 2.1. At inclusion there were no significant differences in DAS28 between the groups. There were no differences (p=0.67) in change of DAS28 between the intervention group (0.14) or control group (0.20) from inclusion to 12 months.

Conclusions: In patients with low disease activity biological therapy could be monitored by a nurse-led rheumatology clinic without any differences in outcome as measured by DAS28.

Keywords
Biological therapy, outcome, nurse-led rheumatology clinic
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-21461 (URN)
Conference
The first World Congress on Debates & Consensus in Bone, Muscle and Joint Diseases (BMJD), The Academy for Clinical Debates & Controversies in Medicine, Barcelona, Spain, 19-22 January, 2012
Available from: 2013-02-12 Created: 2013-02-12 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Svedberg, P., Ivarsson, B., Nilsson, U. G., Roxberg, Å., Baigi, A., Brunt, D., . . . Alm-Roijer, C. (2012). Psychometric evaluation of a Swedish version of Krantz Health Opinion Survey. Open Journal of Nursing, 2(3), 181-187
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric evaluation of a Swedish version of Krantz Health Opinion Survey
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2012 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 181-187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a Swedish version of The Krantz Health Opinion Survey (KHOS). A convenience sample of 79 persons (47 men and 32 women) was recruited from The Heart and Lung Patients’ National Association at ten local meeting places in different areas in Sweden. The questionnaire was examined for face and content validity, internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The findings showed that the Swedish version of KHOS is acceptable in terms of face and content validity, internal consistency and test-retest reliability over time among 79 individuals >65 years of age and with a cardiac disease. In conclusion, wider evaluations of the psychometric use of KHOS for other populations and settings are recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Irvine, CA: Scientific Research Publishing, 2012
Keywords
heart diseases, consumer health information, questionnaire, reliability, content validity
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-19588 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2012.23028 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-09-12 Created: 2012-09-12 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved

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