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Regber, S. (2023). Den specialistutbildade barnsjuksköterskan – yrkestitel och professionsområden (3ed.). In: Kristensson Hallström, Inger; Derwig, Mariette (Ed.), Pediatrisk omvårdnad: (pp. 36-37). Stockholm: Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Den specialistutbildade barnsjuksköterskan – yrkestitel och professionsområden
2023 (Swedish)In: Pediatrisk omvårdnad / [ed] Kristensson Hallström, Inger; Derwig, Mariette, Stockholm: Liber, 2023, 3, p. 36-37Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Liber, 2023 Edition: 3
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-50313 (URN)9789147146017 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-04-12 Created: 2023-04-12 Last updated: 2023-04-12Bibliographically approved
Eklund Karlsson, L., Balkfors, A., Gunnarsdottir, H., Povlsen, L., Regber, S., Buch Mejsner, S., . . . Fosse, E. (2022). Are universal measures sufficient in reducing child poverty in the Nordic countries? An analysis of policies and political commitments. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 50(7), 892-902
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are universal measures sufficient in reducing child poverty in the Nordic countries? An analysis of policies and political commitments
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2022 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 50, no 7, p. 892-902Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) have long traditions of social welfare policies that have eradicated poverty as part of their goals. The purpose of this study was to increase our understanding of why child poverty is still significant in the Nordic countries despite existing strategies. Methods: A qualitative analysis of Nordic government documents and reports between 2007 and 2019 was carried out to track changes in public health priorities and political measures and to determine the similarities and differences between the five countries. Results: In all countries, most of the measures were universal, such as benefits during pregnancy, paid parental leave before and after the child was born, paid parental leave related to children’s sickness, child allowances, day care, free health care for children and support for disabled children. National policies aimed to reduce social inequalities and child poverty exist in all five countries, but unaffordable housing, unequal disposable family income distribution and unequal income distribution at local municipality levels seem to be obstacles to reaching national policy goals. Conclusions: Despite comprehensive universal measures to eradicate child poverty, inequalities are significant and increasing in some of the Nordic countries. This might be due to a lack of proportional universalism, where universal measures are in place in all Nordic countries, but with a lack of scale and intensity proportional to the children and families at risk. The significance of eliminating social inequalities needs to be emphasised at the local level. © Author(s) 2022.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
Nordic countries, child poverty, policy, document analysis, social welfare model, social determinants of health
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-47660 (URN)10.1177/14034948221109694 (DOI)000825035700001 ()35815562 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85133930006 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-08-08 Created: 2022-08-08 Last updated: 2022-10-24Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, E. & Regber, S. (2022). Att leda i pediatrisk omvårdnad (1ed.). In: Kristina Ziegert (Ed.), Våga leda omvårdnad: (pp. 129-151). Stockholm: Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att leda i pediatrisk omvårdnad
2022 (Swedish)In: Våga leda omvårdnad / [ed] Kristina Ziegert, Stockholm: Liber, 2022, 1, p. 129-151Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Liber, 2022 Edition: 1
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-47170 (URN)9789147128396 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-06-17 Created: 2022-06-17 Last updated: 2022-09-06Bibliographically approved
Regber, S. & Forsberg, E. (2021). Improved Learning Support with Minor Costs and Little Efforts: Students with a Disability in Higher Education and Their Perspectives of the Learning Support. Creative Education, 12(11), 2624-2641
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improved Learning Support with Minor Costs and Little Efforts: Students with a Disability in Higher Education and Their Perspectives of the Learning Support
2021 (English)In: Creative Education, ISSN 2151-4755, E-ISSN 2151-4771, Vol. 12, no 11, p. 2624-2641Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In line with the sustainable development goals of Agenda 2030, the higher education institutions strive to achieve the values of an accessible and inclusive higher education for all students. The number of students with disabilities in higher education is rising in several countries. Studies exploring the students’ perspectives of the learning support are lacking. This study explored the students’ perspectives of the learning support provided for students with disabilities in higher education. Interviews with twelve students with various disabilities studying at a university in Sweden were held between 2018 and 2020. Data were analyzed using content analysis. Findings resulted in four categories: 1) A need for specific learning support based on each individual disability, 2) A satisfaction with the given learning support, 3) The student’s disability in relation to their work-based internship, 4) The students’ proposals to ease the study journey. In general, students appreciated having a mentor, a note taker, being able to sit in a smaller room during exams or having extended examination time. The students suggested improvements that could be realized with minor costs and small efforts. To meet the criteria of an inclusive and accessible higher education institution, a good learning support is of great importance. © 2021 by author(s) and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Irvine, CA: Scientific Research Publishing, 2021
Keywords
Accessibility, Students with a Disability, Higher Education, Learning Support, Qualitative Interviews
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-46446 (URN)10.4236/ce.2021.1211196 (DOI)
Note

Funding: The Federation of Nurses Educated at Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden (Kamratförbundet Sahlgrensringen).

Available from: 2022-03-08 Created: 2022-03-08 Last updated: 2022-03-09Bibliographically approved
Regber, S. & Jormfeldt, H. (2019). Foster homes for neglected children with severe obesity— Debated but rarely studied. Acta Paediatrica, 108(11), 1955-1964
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Foster homes for neglected children with severe obesity— Debated but rarely studied
2019 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 11, p. 1955-1964Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To explore current research and theoretical articles on foster home placement of children with severe obesity.

Methods: An integrative literature review. Literature searches in six electronic databases included theoretical, quantitative and qualitative articles and case reports published in English (2008‐2018) on the topic of severe childhood obesity and foster home placement.

Results: Seventeen selected papers included six theoretical articles, nine quantitative studies, one qualitative study and one case report. Eight of the nine quantitative studies did not specify the grading of obesity in children in foster care. The case report and the qualitative study showed distinct and sustainable body mass index (BMI) reductions after a child had been placed in foster care. Five theoretical articles justified foster care placement when chronic parental neglect led to severe obesity in the child, while one article emphasised the opposite.

Conclusion: Parental and societal neglect of children with severe obesity placed in a foster home is rarely studied or the exclusive aim of research. The views of the chil‐dren themselves are lacking in research articles, as well as the child’s right to health obligations concerning children with severe obesity. © 2019 Foundation Acta Pædiatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
Keywords
foster home, integrative literature review, neglect, severe childhood obesity
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40440 (URN)10.1111/apa.14902 (DOI)000480144300001 ()31199006 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85070489390 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funder: Center of Research on Health and Sport, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden

Available from: 2019-08-23 Created: 2019-08-23 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Povlsen, L., Regber, S., Fosse, E., Eklund Karlsson, L. & Gunnarsdottir, H. (2018). Economic poverty among children and adolescents in the Nordic countries. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 46(Suppl. 20), 30-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Economic poverty among children and adolescents in the Nordic countries
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2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 46, no Suppl. 20, p. 30-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: This study aimed to identify applied definitions and measurements of economic poverty and to explore the proportions and characteristics of children and adolescents living in economic poverty in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden during the last decade and to compare various statistics between the Nordic countries.

Methods: Official data from central national authorities on statistics, national reports and European Union Statistics of income and living conditions data were collected and analysed during 2015–2016.

Results: The proportion of Nordic children living in economic poverty in 2014 ranged from 9.4% in Norway to 18.5% in Sweden. Compared with the European Union average, from 2004 to 2014 Nordic families with dependent children experienced fewer difficulties in making their money last, even though Icelandic families reported considerable difficulties. The characteristics of children living in economic poverty proved to be similar in the five countries and were related to their parents’ level of education and employment, single-parent households and – in Denmark, Norway and Sweden – to immigrant background. In Finland, poverty among children was linked in particular to low income in employed households.

Conclusions: This study showed that economic poverty among Nordic families with dependent children has increased during the latest decade, but it also showed that poverty rates are not necessarily connected to families’ ability to make their money last. Therefore additional studies are needed to explore existing policies and political commitments in the Nordic countries to compensate families with dependent children living in poverty. © 2018, © Author(s) 2018.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Children, adolescents, economic poverty, social inequality, children’s rights, Nordic countries
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36514 (URN)10.1177/1403494817743894 (DOI)000428758300005 ()29552966 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044149107 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-24 Created: 2018-03-24 Last updated: 2020-05-08Bibliographically approved
Regber, S., Dahlgren, J. & Janson, S. (2018). Neglected children with severe obesity have a right to health: Is foster home an alternative?—A qualitative study. International Journal of Child Abuse & Neglect (83), 106-119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neglected children with severe obesity have a right to health: Is foster home an alternative?—A qualitative study
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Child Abuse & Neglect, ISSN 0145-2134, E-ISSN 1873-7757, no 83, p. 106-119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To explore key person’s perspectives of foster home placement or notification of risk of harm to Social Services of children with severe obesity.

Methods: This case study research was performed in the southwest of Sweden and based on interviews with nine informants: a foster home youth, two foster parents, a social worker, two hospital social workers, a pediatric physician, a pediatric nurse, and a psychologist. Content analysis was used for narrative evaluations, within- and cross case analyses and displays.

Results: Positive health outcomes of the foster home placement were described as a healthy and normalized weight status, a physically and socially active life, and an optimistic outlook on the future. The foster parents made no major changes in their family routines, but applied an authoritative parenting style regarding limit setting about sweets and food portions and supporting physical activity. The professionals described children with severe obesity as having suffered parental as well as societal neglect. Their biological parents lacked the ability to undertake necessary lifestyle changes. Neglected investigations into learning disabilities and neuropsychiatric disorders were seen in the school and healthcare sector, and better collaboration with the Social Services after a report of harm might be a potential for future improvements. Rival discourses were underlying the (in) decision regarding foster home placement.

Conclusion: A child’s right to health was a strong discourse for acting when a child was at risk for harm, but parental rights are strong when relocation to a foster home is judged to be necessary. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Case study research, Foster home, Rights of the child, Severe childhood obesity, Welfare
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37749 (URN)10.1016/j.chiabu.2018.07.006 (DOI)000443669900012 ()30025301 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85049847320 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-21 Created: 2018-08-21 Last updated: 2020-02-03Bibliographically approved
Bramsved, R., Regber, S., Novak, D., Mehlig, K., Lissner, L. & Mårild, S. (2018). Parental education and family income affect birthweight, early longitudinal growth and body mass index development differently. Acta Paediatrica, 107(11), 1946-1952
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental education and family income affect birthweight, early longitudinal growth and body mass index development differently
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2018 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 11, p. 1946-1952Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: This study investigated the effects of two parental socio-economic characteristics, education and income, on growth and risk of obesity in children from birth to 8 years of age.

METHODS: Longitudinal growth data and national register-based information on socio-economic characteristics were available for 3,030 Swedish children. The development of body mass index (BMI) and height was compared in groups dichotomised by parental education and income.

RESULTS: Low parental education was associated with a higher BMI from 4 years of age, independent of income, immigrant background, maternal BMI and smoking during pregnancy. Low family income was associated with a lower birthweight, but did not independently predict BMI development. At 8 years of age, children from less educated families had a three times higher risk of obesity, independent of parental income. Children whose parents had fewer years of education but high income had significantly higher height than all other children.

CONCLUSION: Parental education protected against childhood obesity, even after adjusting for income and other important parental characteristics. Income-related differences in height, despite similar BMIs, raise questions about body composition and metabolic risk profiles. The dominant role of education underscores the value of health literacy initiatives for the parents of young children. ©2018 Foundation Acta Pædiatrica.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2018
Keywords
Birthweight, Childhood obesity, Health promotion, Parental education, Socio-economic factors
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36352 (URN)10.1111/apa.14215 (DOI)000446822800018 ()29315777 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041611646 (Scopus ID)
Note

Shared first authorship: Rebecka Bramsved & Susann Regber

Available from: 2018-02-26 Created: 2018-02-26 Last updated: 2018-10-26Bibliographically approved
Börnhorst, C., Siani, A., Tornaritis, M., Molnár, D., Lissner, L. & Regber, S. (2018). Potential selection effects when estimating associations between the infancy peak or adiposity rebound and later body mass index in children. Paper presented at European Congress of Epidemiology “Crises, epidemiological transitions and the role of epidemiologists” July 4-6, 2018 Lyon, France. Revue d'épidémiologie et de santé publique, 66(Suppl. 5), S422-S423
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Potential selection effects when estimating associations between the infancy peak or adiposity rebound and later body mass index in children
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2018 (English)In: Revue d'épidémiologie et de santé publique, ISSN 0398-7620, E-ISSN 1773-0627, Vol. 66, no Suppl. 5, p. S422-S423Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: Lots of research has been conducted to identify early life factors or growth characteristics in infancy and childhood related to an unfavorable weight development. For instance, a late age at infancy peak (IP), an early age at adiposity rebound (AR) as well as body mass index (BMI) at IP and AR were shown to be positively associated with later adiposity status. The present study aims to investigate the usefulness of the IP and AR in comparison to other measures of BMI growth as indicators of later weight status. For the first time, the selection effect possibly occurring when excluding children with non-identifiable IP or AR will be explored.

Methods: Identification and Prevention of Dietary- and Lifestyle-Induced Health Effects in Children and Infants (IDEFICS)/I. Family is an ongoing cohort study conducted in eight European countries with 16,229 children participating in the baseline survey in 2006/2007 [1]. In a subset of 4744 children with at least four repeated measurements of height and weight in the age interval from 0 to 8 years (37,998 measurements in total; survey data supplemented with records of routine child visits), fractional polynomial mixed-effects models were used to derive individual BMI trajectories. Based on these trajectories, age and BMI at IP and AR, BMI values and growth velocities at selected ages as well as the area under the BMI curve were estimated. The BMI growth measures were standardized and related to later BMI z-scores (mean age at outcome assessment: 9.2 years).

Results: Age and BMI at IP and AR were not identifiable in 5.4% and 7.8% of the children, respectively. These groups of children showed a significantly higher BMI growth during infancy and childhood. In the remaining sample, BMI at IP correlated almost perfectly (r ≥ 0.99) with BMI at ages 0.5, 1 and 1.5 years, whereas BMI at AR correlated perfectly with BMI at ages 4–6 years (r ≥ 0.98). In the total study group, BMI values in infancy and childhood were positively associated with later BMI z-scores where associations increased with age. Associations between BMI velocities and later BMI z-scores were largest at ages 5 and 6 years. Results markedly differed for children with non-identifiable IP and AR, demonstrating a selection effect.

Conclusions: IP and AR may not be estimable in children with higher-than-average BMI growth. Excluding these children from analyses may result in a selection bias that distorts effect estimates. BMI values at ages 1 and 5 years might be more appropriate to use as predictors for later weight status instead.

© 2018 Published by Elsevier Masson SAS

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Issy les Moulineaux Cedex: Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
BMI trajectory, cohort of European children, growth velocity, fractional polynomial mixed-effects model, selection bias
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37703 (URN)10.1016/j.respe.2018.05.508 (DOI)
Conference
European Congress of Epidemiology “Crises, epidemiological transitions and the role of epidemiologists” July 4-6, 2018 Lyon, France
Note

Poster number: P10-2

Available from: 2018-08-14 Created: 2018-08-14 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Börnhorst, C., Siani, A., Tornaritis, M., Molnár, D., Lissner, L., Regber, S., . . . Pigeot, I. (2017). Potential selection effects when estimating associations between the infancy peak or adiposity rebound and later body mass index in children. International Journal of Obesity, 41(4), 518-526
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Potential selection effects when estimating associations between the infancy peak or adiposity rebound and later body mass index in children
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 518-526Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION:This study aims to evaluate a potential selection effect caused by exclusion of children with non-identifiable infancy peak (IP) and adiposity rebound (AR) when estimating associations between age and body mass index (BMI) at IP and AR and later weight status

SUBJECTS AND METHODS: In 4744 children with at least 4 repeated measurements of height and weight in the age interval from 0 to 8 years (37 998 measurements) participating in the IDEFICS (Identification and Prevention of Dietary- and Lifestyle-Induced Health Effects in Children and Infants)/I.Family cohort study, fractional polynomial multilevel models were used to derive individual BMI trajectories. Based on these trajectories, age and BMI at IP and AR, BMI values and growth velocities at selected ages as well as the area under the BMI curve were estimated. The BMI growth measures were standardized and related to later BMI z-scores (mean age at outcome assessment: 9.2 years).

RESULTS: Age and BMI at IP and AR were not identifiable in 5.4% and 7.8% of the children, respectively. These groups of children showed a significantly higher BMI growth during infancy and childhood. In the remaining sample, BMI at IP correlated almost perfectly (r⩾0.99) with BMI at ages 0.5, 1 and 1.5 years, whereas BMI at AR correlated perfectly with BMI at ages 4-6 years (r⩾0.98). In the total study group, BMI values in infancy and childhood were positively associated with later BMI z-scores where associations increased with age. Associations between BMI velocities and later BMI z-scores were largest at ages 5 and 6 years. Results differed for children with non-identifiable IP and AR, demonstrating a selection effect.

CONCLUSIONS: IP and AR may not be estimable in children with higher-than-average BMI growth. Excluding these children from analyses may result in a selection bias that distorts effect estimates. BMI values at ages 1 and 5 years might be more appropriate to use as predictors for later weight status instead. © 2017 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Nature Publishing Group, 2017
Keywords
cohort of European children, growth velocity, fractional polynomial mixed effects model, IDEFICS study, I.Family study
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-33158 (URN)10.1038/ijo.2016.218 (DOI)000399342200007 ()27899810 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85006340401 (Scopus ID)
Projects
The IDEFICS study (Identification and Prevention of Dietary- and Lifestyle-Induced Health Effects in Children and Infants)and I.Family cohort study
Available from: 2017-01-29 Created: 2017-01-29 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2631-2825

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