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Lindwall, Magnus
Publications (10 of 56) Show all publications
Fröberg, A., Jonsson, L., Berg, C., Lindgren, E.-C., Korp, P., Lindwall, M., . . . Larsson, C. (2018). Effects of an Empowerment-Based Health-Promotion School Intervention on Physical Activity and Sedentary Time among Adolescents in a Multicultural Area. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15(11), Article ID 2542.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of an Empowerment-Based Health-Promotion School Intervention on Physical Activity and Sedentary Time among Adolescents in a Multicultural Area
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 11, article id 2542Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Physical activity (PA) decreases with age, and interventions are needed to promote PA during adolescence, especially, among those in low-socioeconomic status (SES) areas. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a two-year, empowerment-based health-promotion school intervention had any effects on changes in (a) moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), (b) sedentary time (SED), (c) exercise training (ET) frequency, and (d) ET duration, among adolescents. Participants (aged 12⁻13 years at baseline) from one intervention school and two control schools, were recruited from a multicultural area of Sweden, characterized by low-SES. During the course of the two-year intervention, a total of 135 participants (43% boys) were included in the study. The intervention was developed and implemented as a result of cooperation and shared decision-making among the researchers and the participants. MVPA and SED were measured with accelerometers, and ET frequency and duration was self-reported at the beginning of the seventh, eighth, and ninth grade, respectively. There were no significant effects of the two-year, empowerment-based health-promotion school intervention on changes in the accelerometer-measured MVPA and SED, or the self-reported ET frequency and duration, among the adolescents. Overall, the intervention was unsuccessful at promoting PA and reducing SED. Several possible explanations for the intervention's lack of effects are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: MDPI, 2018
Keywords
empowerment, exercise, health promotion, participatory, physical activity, school, sedentary behavior
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38492 (URN)10.3390/ijerph15112542 (DOI)30428548 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056651266 (Scopus ID)
Projects
How-to-Act?
Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2018-12-10Bibliographically approved
Stenling, A., Ivarsson, A., Lindwall, M. & Gucciardi, D. F. (2018). Exploring longitudinal measurement invariance and the continuum hypothesis in the Swedish version of the Behavioral Regulation in Sport Questionnaire (BRSQ): An exploratory structural equation modeling approach. Psychology of Sport And Exercise, 36, 187-196
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring longitudinal measurement invariance and the continuum hypothesis in the Swedish version of the Behavioral Regulation in Sport Questionnaire (BRSQ): An exploratory structural equation modeling approach
2018 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 36, p. 187-196Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

The aims of the present study were to: (a) examine longitudinal measurement invariance in the Swedish version of the Behavioral Regulations in Sport Questionnaire (BRSQ) and (b) examine the continuum hypothesis of motivation as postulated within self-determination theory.

Design

Two-wave survey.

Method

Young competitive athletes (N = 354) responded to the BRSQ early in the season (November) and at the end of the athletic season (April). Data were analyzed using exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) and bifactor ESEM.

Results

We found support for strict longitudinal measurement invariance in the BRSQ. Latent mean comparisons showed an increase in external regulation and amotivation across the season. The latent factor correlations indicated some deviations from a simplex pattern related to amotivation, external regulation, and introjected regulation. In the bifactor model, intrinsic motivation items had negative factor loadings on the global factor, identified regulation items had factor loadings approaching zero, and introjected and external regulation and amotivation items all had moderate to strong positive factor loadings.

Conclusion

The present study adds longitudinal measurement invariance to the psychometric evidence of the BRSQ. Research on why the latent means of the behavioral regulations changed over the athletic season is warranted. The continuum hypothesis was partially supported. Latent factor correlations and factor loadings on the global factor in the bifactor ESEM highlighted that the discriminant validity of the controlled regulations and amotivation needs further investigation. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Latent mean changes, Motivation continuum, Self-determination theory, Temporal stability
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36388 (URN)10.1016/j.psychsport.2018.03.002 (DOI)2-s2.0-85043782981 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: Andreas Stenling was supported by grants from Umeå School of Sport Sciences (Dnr: IH 5.3-12-2017) and the Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports (CIF), grant numbers P2014-0043 and P2015-0114. Daniel F. Gucciardi is supported by a Curtin Research Fellowship.

Available from: 2018-03-06 Created: 2018-03-06 Last updated: 2018-04-12Bibliographically approved
Weman Josefsson, K., Johnson, U. & Lindwall, M. (2018). Zooming in on the Effects: a Controlled Trial on Motivation and Exercise Behaviour in a Digital Context. Current psychology (New Brunswick, N.J.), 37(1), 250-262
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Zooming in on the Effects: a Controlled Trial on Motivation and Exercise Behaviour in a Digital Context
2018 (English)In: Current psychology (New Brunswick, N.J.), ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 250-262Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study is a description of a short-term digital exercise intervention based on the theoretical framework self-determination theory and tested in a controlled trial. The sample consisted of 318 adult women (n = 279) and men (n = 40) aged 23–67 years (M = 46.7; SD = 9.4) participating in a digital step contest provided by their employer. All participants completed study baseline measures via validated web-based versions of the following instruments: Basic Psychological Needs in Exercise Scale, Behavioural Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire-2, and Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire. These measures were repeated twice, 3 weeks (post-intervention) and 6 weeks (follow-up) after study baseline. The experimental group had access to the intervention platform for three weeks. Data were analysed by analyses of covariance and mediation variable analysis. Results showed the intervention to affect exercise level and intensity as well as basic psychological need satisfaction and behavioural regulations. Intervention effects on amotivation post-intervention were found to mediate total exercise behaviour at follow-up. Moderation analyses showed intervention effects on light exercise to be stronger for those participants engaging in moderate or high levels of light activities at study baseline. Also, the effect on identified regulation was stronger for those with low levels of identified regulation at study baseline. This study adds to the knowledge on exercise motivation based on short-term intervention effects on level and intensity of exercise and physical activity. The use of mediating and moderating analyses uncover processes underlying the main intervention effects. Findings are discussed in relation to self-determination theory and previous research. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2018
Keywords
Exercise Intervention Mediation Moderation Self-determination
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-32123 (URN)10.1007/s12144-016-9508-1 (DOI)2-s2.0-84988942781 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Note

Funded by Halmstad University, University of Gothenburg and the Swedish KK-foundation.

Available from: 2016-10-02 Created: 2016-10-02 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Weman Josefsson, K., Ivarsson, A., Johnson, U. & Lindwall, M. (2017). Effects of a digital intervention program on motivational regulation patterns in an exercise context: A latent transition analysis of the “motivational soup”. In: Gangyan, S., Cruz, J. & Jaenes, J.C. (Ed.), Sport Psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the XIV ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology. Paper presented at ISSP 14th World Congress of Sport Psychology, Sevilla, Spain, 2017, July 10-14, 2017 (pp. 319-320). Sevilla: International Society of Sport Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a digital intervention program on motivational regulation patterns in an exercise context: A latent transition analysis of the “motivational soup”
2017 (English)In: Sport Psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the XIV ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] Gangyan, S., Cruz, J. & Jaenes, J.C., Sevilla: International Society of Sport Psychology , 2017, p. 319-320Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Within the self-determination theory of motivation the concept “motivational soup” refers to motivational regulations forming profiles of accumulated drives towards behavior. Few studies have examined the probability of intervention effects to change such motivational profiles over time, knowledge that might inform future program design to promote sustainable exercise motivation. Participants (N=318) were 279 women and 40 men, aged 23-67 years (Mage=46.7; SD=9.4) consisting of adult members of a web-based step contest provided by their employers. Of the 166 individuals randomly assigned to the experimental group, 85 logged in to the digital intervention platform at least once and were considered treated as intended. This group had access to a web-based digital exercise motivation intervention based on SDT for three weeks. The trial had three measure points; T1 baseline, T2 (3 weeks) and a follow up T3 (6 weeks). To investigate the potential effect of the intervention on the odds of participants to change motivational profiles between T1 and T3 we used Latent Transition Analysis. The intervention had positive main effects on exercise level. A four profile solution showed good quality of classification into the separate profiles (entropy = .92). The profiles were labeled high-high (n=262), high-low (n=26), low-high (n=8), and low-low (n=12), where the label high reflected a more autonomous regulation pattern (missing n=10). Participants in the autonomous profile at T1 had high probabilities of remaining there at T3, but slightly lower probability in the control (82%) than the intervention (95%) condition. Participants in the control condition also had a statistically significant increased probability to belong to the profile with a decreased level autonomy T3 (high-low profile) (OR=4.0, p=.008).These results indicate that this digital exercise motivation intervention can increase the likelihood for participants to sustain autonomous motivation profiles over time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sevilla: International Society of Sport Psychology, 2017
Keywords
motivational soup, latent transition analysis, exercise, self-determination, motivational profiles, intervention
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34970 (URN)978-84-9148-282-6 (ISBN)
Conference
ISSP 14th World Congress of Sport Psychology, Sevilla, Spain, 2017, July 10-14, 2017
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2017-09-15 Created: 2017-09-15 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Stenling, A., Ivarsson, A., Hassmén, P. & Lindwall, M. (2017). Longitudinal associations between athletes’ controlled motivation, ill-being, and perceptions of controlling coach behaviors: A Bayesian latent growth curve approach. Psychology of Sport And Exercise, 30, 205-214
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal associations between athletes’ controlled motivation, ill-being, and perceptions of controlling coach behaviors: A Bayesian latent growth curve approach
2017 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 30, p. 205-214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although many scholars have argued that leadership is a dynamic process jointly produced by leaders and followers, leadership in sports is most often researched as a unidirectional process from coaches to athletes. Within self-determination theory (SDT), individual characteristics are suggested to influence how people perceive external events such as coaches' behaviors. In the present study, we examined this jointly produced leadership process by investigating longitudinal associations between athletes' controlled motivation, ill-being, and perceptions of coaches' controlling behaviors at the between- and within-person levels. The participants were 247 young elite skiers enrolled at Swedish sport high schools who responded to self-report questionnaires at three time points over the course of an athletic season. At the between-person level, increases in perceptions of coaches' controlling behaviors over the season positively predicted controlled motivation at the end of the season, and controlled motivation at the beginning of the season positively predicted ill-being at the end of the season. At the within-person level, athletes' controlled motivation positively predicted perceptions of coaches’ controlling behaviors. The results at the between-person level support the unidirectional perspective and the tenets of SDT. The results at the within-person level suggest that individual characteristics such as motivation can influence how athletes perceive external events, which has been proposed theoretically but seldom examined empirically. Three plausible explanations for this reversed association are presented in the discussion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Bayesian estimation, Depression/anxiety, Growth models, Interpersonal control, Leadership, Sports
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-33548 (URN)10.1016/j.psychsport.2017.03.002 (DOI)000400038900023 ()2-s2.0-85015661965 (Scopus ID)
Note

Andreas Stenling was supported by grants from Umeå School of Sport Sciences and the Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports (CIF), grant numbers P2014-0043 and P2015-0114.

Available from: 2017-03-13 Created: 2017-03-13 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Weman Josefsson, K., Fröberg, K., Karlsson, S. & Lindwall, M. (2017). Mechanisms in Self-Determined Exercise Motivation: Effects of a Theory Informed Pilot Intervention. Current psychology (New Brunswick, N.J.), 36(1), 90-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mechanisms in Self-Determined Exercise Motivation: Effects of a Theory Informed Pilot Intervention
2017 (English)In: Current psychology (New Brunswick, N.J.), ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 90-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose was to examine the effects of an exercise pilot intervention informed by Self-determination theory. The 64 participants were randomized into experimental and control group. The main questions were whether the intervention would influence (a) exercise level, (b) motivation quality, and (c) autonomy and competence need satisfaction. We also examined the indirect effects of self-determined motivation on exercise. Significant intervention effects were found regarding exercise level and motivation quality. Also, intervention effect on exercise was found to be mediated by motivation quality and identified regulation. The results provide interesting information about the underlying mechanisms involved in exercise behaviour change. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Springer, 2017
Keywords
Exercise, Intervention, Motivation, Self-determination
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-29677 (URN)10.1007/s12144-015-9388-9 (DOI)000395448500010 ()2-s2.0-84944929511 (Scopus ID)
Note

This research was financially supported by the Centre for person-centred care at Gothenburg University and by Halmstad University.

Available from: 2015-10-26 Created: 2015-10-26 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Josefsson, T., Ivarsson, A., Lindwall, M., Gustafsson, H., Böröy, J., Mattsson, E., . . . Falkevik, E. (2017). Mindfulness Mechanisms in Sports: Mediating Effects of Rumination and Emotion Regulation on Sport-Specific Coping. Mindfulness, 8(5), 1354-1363
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mindfulness Mechanisms in Sports: Mediating Effects of Rumination and Emotion Regulation on Sport-Specific Coping
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2017 (English)In: Mindfulness, ISSN 1868-8527, E-ISSN 1868-8535, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 1354-1363Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The main objective of the project was to examine a proposed theoretical model of mindfulness mechanisms in sports. We conducted two studies (the first study using a cross-sectional design and the second a longitudinal design) to investigate if rumination and emotion regulation mediate the relation between dispositional mindfulness and sport-specific coping. Two hundred and forty-two young elite athletes, drawn from various sports, were recruited for the cross-sectional study. For the longitudinal study, 65 elite athletes were recruited. All analyses were performed using Bayesian statistics. The path analyses showed credible indirect effects of dispositional mindfulness on coping via rumination and emotion regulation in both the cross-sectional study and the longitudinal study. Additionally, the results in both studies showed credible direct effects of dispositional mindfulness on rumination and emotion regulation. Further, credible direct effects of emotion regulation as well as rumination on coping were also found in both studies. Our findings support the theoretical model, indicating that rumination and emotion regulation function as essential mechanisms in the relation between dispositional mindfulness and sport-specific coping skills. Increased dispositional mindfulness in competitive athletes (i.e. by practicing mindfulness) may lead to reductions in rumination, as well as an improved capacity to regulate negative emotions. By doing so, athletes may improve their sport-related coping skills, and thereby enhance athletic performance. © The Author(s) 2017.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Springer-Verlag New York, 2017
Keywords
coping, emotion regulation, mindfulness, performance, rumination, sport
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34964 (URN)10.1007/s12671-017-0711-4 (DOI)000411241000022 ()2-s2.0-85029680696 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, D2016-0037/ P2016-0146
Available from: 2017-09-15 Created: 2017-09-15 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Ivarsson, A., Johnson, U., Andersen, M. B., Tranaeus, U., Stenling, A. & Lindwall, M. (2017). Psychosocial Factors and Sport Injuries: Meta-analyses for Prediction and Prevention. Sports Medicine, 47(2), 353-365
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychosocial Factors and Sport Injuries: Meta-analyses for Prediction and Prevention
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2017 (English)In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 353-365Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Several studies have suggested that psy- chosocial variables can increase the risk of becoming injured during sport participation.

Objectives: The main objectives of these meta-analyses were to examine (i) the effect sizes of relationships between the psychosocial variables (suggested as injury predictors in the model of stress and athletic injury) and injury rates, and (ii) the effects of psychological interven- tions aimed at reducing injury occurrence (prevention).

Methods: Electronic databases as well as specific sport and exercise psychology journals were searched. The literature review resulted in 48 published studies containing 161 effect sizes for injury prediction and seven effect sizes for injury prevention.

Results: The results showed that stress responses (r = 0.27, 80 % CI [0.20, 0.33]) and history of stressors (r = 0.13, 80 % CI [0.11, 0.15]) had the strongest associations with injury rates. Also, the results from the path analysis showed that the stress response mediated the relationship between history of stressors and injury rates. For injury prevention studies, all studies included (N = 7) showed decreased injury rates in the treatment groups compared to control groups.

Conclusion: The results support the model’s suggestion that psychosocial variables, as well as psychologically, based interventions, can influence injury risk among athletes. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Auckland: Adis International Ltd., 2017
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-31630 (URN)10.1007/s40279-016-0578-x (DOI)000393332100011 ()27406221 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84978066615 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-07-13 Created: 2016-07-13 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Lindwall, M., Ivarsson, A., Weman Josefsson, K., Jonsson, L., Ntoumanis, N., Patrick, H., . . . Teixeira, P. (2017). Stirring the motivational soup: within-person latent profiles of motivation in exercise. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 14(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stirring the motivational soup: within-person latent profiles of motivation in exercise
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, ISSN 1479-5868, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 14, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The purpose of the present study was to use a person-oriented analytical approach to identify latent motivational profiles, based on the different behavioural regulations for exercise, and to examine differences in satisfaction of basic psychological needs (competence, autonomy and relatedness) and exercise behaviour across these motivational profiles.

Methods

Two samples, consisting of 1084 and 511 adults respectively, completed exercise-related measures of behavioural regulation and psychological need satisfaction as well as exercise behaviour. Latent profile analyses were used to identify motivational profiles.

Results

Six profiles, representing different combinations of regulations for exercise, were found to best represent data in both samples. Some profiles were found in both samples (e.g., low motivation profile, self-determined motivation profile and self-determined with high introjected regulation profile), whereas others were unique to each sample. In line with the Self-Determination Theory, individuals belonging to more self-determined profiles demonstrated higher scores on need satisfaction.

Conclusions

The results support the notions of motivation being a multidimensional construct and that people have different, sometimes competing, reasons for engaging in exercise. The benefits of using person-oriented analyses to examine within-person interactions of motivation and different regulations are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2017
Keywords
Motivation profile, Person-oriented, Exercise, Need satisfaction, Self-determination
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-33075 (URN)10.1186/s12966-017-0464-4 (DOI)000395349900001 ()2-s2.0-85009410594 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports (grant number P2015-0050), Centre for Person-Centred Care at Gothenburg University; Halmstad University; Health Technology Centre Halland; Tappa Service AB and the European Regional Development Fund.

Available from: 2017-01-16 Created: 2017-01-16 Last updated: 2018-12-04Bibliographically approved
Stenling, A., Ivarsson, A. & Lindwall, M. (2017). The only constant is change: analysing and understanding change in sport and exercise psychology research. International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 10(1), 230-251
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The only constant is change: analysing and understanding change in sport and exercise psychology research
2017 (English)In: International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1750-984X, E-ISSN 1750-9858, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 230-251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ability to examine within-person change is essential to test process-based theories in sport and exercise psychology. Longitudinal data, whether experimental or observational, are prerequisites to be able to examine change processes, but most longitudinal studies in sport and exercise psychology focus solely on between-person/group differences, not on within-person change. In this review, we (1) provide researchers in the sport and exercise psychology field with a framework for longitudinal research that focuses on within-person change; (2) provide an overview of how researchers in sport and exercise psychology currently analyse longitudinal data, which showed that most longitudinal studies focus on between-person/group differences; and (3) provide examples of statistical models for analysing longitudinal data that correspond to the framework for longitudinal research. In the examples, we focus on latent variable modelling, such as latent growth-curve modelling and latent change-score modelling, which capture within-person change. We argue that there is a need for stronger emphasis on the match among theory of change, temporal design, and statistical models when designing longitudinal studies in sport and exercise psychology. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2017
Keywords
Latent variable modelling, longitudinal data analysis, time, within-person change
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-31656 (URN)10.1080/1750984X.2016.1216150 (DOI)000408020100009 ()2-s2.0-84991832964 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-07-18 Created: 2016-07-18 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
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