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Telle, S. & Svensson, S. (2019). An organizational ecology approach to EGTC creation in East Central Europe. Regional & Federal Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An organizational ecology approach to EGTC creation in East Central Europe
2019 (English)In: Regional & Federal Studies, ISSN 1359-7566, E-ISSN 1743-9434Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

European Groupings of Territorial Cooperation (EGTC) are a legal instrument intended to facilitate institutional cross-border cooperation. Launched in 2006, EGTC creation was particularly swift in East Central Europe, albeit with significant variation between different border regions. The article adopts an organizational ecology perspective to explain this variation and argues that the level of organizational density inside a cross-border ecological niche is crucial for EGTC creation. The analysis draws on policy documents and semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders from four border areas in East Central Europe. It finds that lower levels of organizational density in unitary states constitute a favourable organizational environment for EGTC creation. However, rather than enhancing autonomous decision-making in the border region, we find evidence that unitary state support for EGTC creation reflects a political strategy to centralize control over cross-border cooperation. © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Cohesion policy, cross-border governance, European Groupings of Territorial Cooperation (EGTC), organizational ecology, Cohesion policy, cross-border governance, European Groupings of Territorial Cooperation (EGTC), organizational ecology
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38810 (URN)10.1080/13597566.2019.1566904 (DOI)2-s2.0-85060241449 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Socioeconomic and Political Responses to Regional Polarization in Central and Eastern Europe’ (RegPol²)
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, FP7/2007–2013/
Note

Funding: the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007–2013/ under REA grant agreement n° 607022.

Available from: 2019-01-30 Created: 2019-01-30 Last updated: 2019-10-15
Batory, A. & Svensson, S. (2019). Regulating Collaboration: The Legal Framework of Collaborative Governance in Ten European Countries. International Journal of Public Administration
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regulating Collaboration: The Legal Framework of Collaborative Governance in Ten European Countries
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 0190-0692, E-ISSN 1532-4265Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many scholars have considered when and why collaboration between government agencies and societal actors occurs. This article argues that a simple but largely overlooked answer to these questions is that a formal legal or administrative requirement to do so is in place. Therefore, the objective is to substantiate whether there are legal requirements to collaborate and in what type of source and context this obligation applies in ten European countries. The main finding is that collaboration is underpinned by an extensive range of legal requirements in Europe, although imposing these requirements is generally not the main objective. © 2019 The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Taylor & Francis, 2019
National Category
Law and Society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40603 (URN)10.1080/01900692.2019.1658771 (DOI)2-s2.0-85071716167 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 726840
Note

Published online: 03 Sep 2019

Available from: 2019-09-19 Created: 2019-09-19 Last updated: 2019-09-19Bibliographically approved
Batory, A. & Svensson, S. (2019). The fuzzy concept of collaborative governance: A systematic review of the state of the art. Central European Journal of Public Policy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The fuzzy concept of collaborative governance: A systematic review of the state of the art
2019 (English)In: Central European Journal of Public Policy, ISSN 1802-4866, E-ISSN 1802-4866Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This article contributes to the consolidation and synthesis of scholarship on collaborative governance by expanding our knowledge of how the term is used in the academic literature and policy documents in a range of European countries. It adds value to the existing reviews of the field by conducting a systematic literature review on a corpus of over 700 article abstracts and a traditional literature review identifying five key analytical dimensions. The article also provides an exploratory analysis of grey literature hitherto outside the purview of researchers and considers the linguistic and cultural connotations that alter the meaning of the term when translated into new contexts in ten EU/EFTA countries. Findings indicate heterogeneity and fuzziness in the way the concept is used. The article argues that explicit positions with respect to five main analytical dimensions and taking into account the national connotations that the term carries across political systems would inject more clarity into the academic discourse. This, in turn, will help policymakers to make informed use of the concept, especially in multi-national policy-making arenas. © 2019 Agnes Batory et al., published by Sciendo 2019.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Warsaw: Sciendo, 2019
Keywords
collaborative governance, participatory governance, public administration, connotation of collaboration, systematic literature review
National Category
Public Administration Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41114 (URN)10.2478/cejpp-2019-0008 (DOI)2-s2.0-85075185535 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 726840
Available from: 2019-12-04 Created: 2019-12-04 Last updated: 2019-12-06Bibliographically approved
Irion, K., Delinavelli, G., Coutinho, M. F., Fathaigh, R. Ó., Jusić, T., Klimkiewicz, B., . . . van Til, G. (2019). The independence of media regulatory authorities in Europe. Strasbourg: European Audiovisual Observatory
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The independence of media regulatory authorities in Europe
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2019 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This IRIS Special focuses on the independence of regulatory authorities and bodies in the broadcasting and audiovisual media sector in Europe. These entities have proliferated according to the different legal traditions of the respective countries they belong to. They do not, therefore, conform one, single model. Nonetheless, they reflect a common approach of sorts with regard to the institutional set-up of regulatory governance. The independence of these entities is particularly important because it contributes to the broader objective of media independence, which is in itself an essential component of democracy.

The creation, status and functioning of these regulatory authorities and bodies were shaped pursuant to the constitutional requirements and/or administrative practices of the countries that established them. As a result, each has distinct characteristics and levels of independence that differ according to where they are located. But when is an authority to be considered independent? The measurement of an entity's independence requires careful analysis of the legal texts setting it up, but also of the practices that are rooted in reality and reflect the sensitivities of the societies in question.

This IRIS Special aims to enlighten the reader on the definition of the independence of a regulatory authority or body, on the criteria used to assess its independence, and on the legal framework embodying this independence at the European level, as well as provide analysis of the status and functioning of regulatory authorities and bodies in a selection of nine European countries: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Spain, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Sweden, and Slovenia. This sample reflects the different levels of independence that can be found across Europe. © European Audiovisual Observatory (Council of Europe), Strasbourg, September 2019

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Strasbourg: European Audiovisual Observatory, 2019. p. 125
Series
IRIS Special ; 2019-1
Keywords
Media regulation, regulatory independence
National Category
Law and Society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40656 (URN)
Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2019-10-10
Eschweiler, J., Svensson, S., Mocca, E., Cartwright, A. & Villadsen Nielsen, L. (2019). The Reciprocity Dimension of Solidarity: Insights from Three European Countries. VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, 30(3), 549-561
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Reciprocity Dimension of Solidarity: Insights from Three European Countries
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2019 (English)In: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 549-561Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The article argues that closer attention to how solidarity is understood and expressed in different European contexts can shed light on the conditions for establishing a social and solidarity economy. Drawing on data collected within the H2020 SOLIDUS project, which explores current expressions of European solidarity, the comparative analysis covers three social economy initiatives, each representing a country with different political and economic context. The analysis focuses on solidarity as reciprocity and, in particular, how it is affected by such factors as actor motivations, internal participatory functioning, resource mix and political legitimacy. While further empirical work is needed, the findings suggest that solidarity as reciprocity produced by social and solidarity economy organisations thrives where political institutions are both supportive and trusted, where public funding is accessible, and where partnerships with relatively autonomous social and solidarity economy organisations are genuinely collaborative. © 2019, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Springer, 2019
Keywords
Social economy, Solidarity, Civil society, Public policy, Europe
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38831 (URN)10.1007/s11266-018-0031-x (DOI)2-s2.0-85060141232 (Scopus ID)
Projects
‘Solidarity in European societies: empowerment, social justice and citizenship—SOLIDUS’
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 649489
Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2019-06-12Bibliographically approved
Svensson, S. & Batory, A. (2019). The Use and Abuse of Participatory Governance by Populist Governments. Policy and politics (Print), 47(2), 227-244
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Use and Abuse of Participatory Governance by Populist Governments
2019 (English)In: Policy and politics (Print), ISSN 0305-5736, E-ISSN 1470-8442, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 227-244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Populists claim that they alone represent the voice of the people against a corrupt elite. We argue that populist governments augment this claim by appropriating and manipulating the language and methods of participatory governance. Advancing an analytical framework on content, process, effect, resource efficiency and communication dimensions, we illustrate these arguments with the National Consultations in Hungary in 2010–18. Our conclusion for the case study is that these exercises were deeply flawed for securing popular input into policy-making. The implication for scholarship is that participatory governance enthusiasts need to be more aware not just of the uses, but also the abuses, of public input, while scholars of populism should pay more attention to the actual policies and practices populist actors employ to gain or maintain power.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Policy Press, 2019
Keywords
Populism, public administration, Hungary, collaborative governance, participatory governance, populism, offentlig förvaltning, Ungern, samverkansstyrning, deltagarstyrning
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39274 (URN)10.1332/030557319X15487805848586 (DOI)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020
Available from: 2019-04-26 Created: 2019-04-26 Last updated: 2019-04-29Bibliographically approved
Svensson, S. & Cartwright, A. (2018). Challenges to participatory governance in solidarity initiatives and social enterprises: the case of Hungary. In: 3rd EMES-Polanyi International Seminar: Welfare societies in transition. Paper presented at 3rd EMES-Polanyi International Seminar: Welfare societies in transition, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark, April 16-17, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges to participatory governance in solidarity initiatives and social enterprises: the case of Hungary
2018 (English)In: 3rd EMES-Polanyi International Seminar: Welfare societies in transition, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

As echoed in the Call for Papers to this conference, the literature on solidarity economy and social enterprises has emphasized the importance of more dialogue between the global ‘North’ and global ‘South’ on practices and knowledge related to solidarity economy, social innovation and social enterprise. We start from the assumption that there is a similar lack of dialogue across Europe’s different realities, with especially Eastern practitioners and scholars missing from European and global forums of debate. 

This paper offers a self-reflective analysis of research on solidarity initiatives carried out in Hungary within the framework of the EU-funded project “Solidarity in European Societies: Empowerment, Social Justice and Citizenship”. The paper starts with presenting findings derived from ten case studies spanning five policy areas (access to housing, education for vulnerable minorities, refugee support, mental health and local food provision/rural development) focusing on whether participatory governance was a characteristic and/or conducive factor for success. It then analyses the extent to whether large-scale European collaborative research projects may push certain ideas and narratives onto contexts for which they are not suitable, and the consequences thereof. Our central argument based on this double analysis is that the Hungarian case studies do not support the notion that participatory governance is a precondition for social enterprises and solidarity economy initiatives to strive.

National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39767 (URN)
Conference
3rd EMES-Polanyi International Seminar: Welfare societies in transition, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark, April 16-17, 2018
Available from: 2019-06-14 Created: 2019-06-14 Last updated: 2019-10-02Bibliographically approved
Svensson, S. & Telle, S. (2018). Collaborative and cross-border urban governance: What does experience teach us?. In: Report on the 5th workshop of the RSA research network on Regional Economic and Policy History: . Paper presented at 5th ReHi workshop: A historical perspective on multi-level urban economic development policy. Paisley, Scotland. November 29-30, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collaborative and cross-border urban governance: What does experience teach us?
2018 (English)In: Report on the 5th workshop of the RSA research network on Regional Economic and Policy History, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

While border areas are often portrayed as peripheries (Stoddard 1991), in the European Union many urban centers are located in close proximity to national borders. Since the 1950s,there has been increasing policy activity in suchborder regions. Through associations of municipalities, regions and private actors, often through so called Euroregions (Perkmann2003), local actors have formed collaborative governance arrangements to solve joint policy problems, pursue common normative ideals or simply to utilize available funds (Svensson 2013). This paper exploresthe extent to which urban cross-borderand inter-regionalarrangements wereable to connect actors in collaborative frameworks to drive economic development (policy). First, the paper shows that parallel to economic and political integration in Europe, urban regionsincreasinglybegan to beseenas engines of economic growth. Second, the paperreviewsthe collaborative governance literature and adapts the insights to the question of how urban economic development may benefit from collaboration.Third, the paper uses project data on cross-border and interregional cooperation intwo European capital city regions in proximity to a national border: Vienna and Copenhagen. We focus on projectscovering two themes: economic cooperation and governance.The analysis evaluates how cooperation evolved over the last three programming periods. Next, it evaluates differences and similarities in objectives and project structures (number and type of partners, funding, governance) between cross-border and interregional. Finally, concerning outcomes, the paper analyses severalprojects in depth regarding impact, learning and sustainability. Drawing on the analytical framework derived from the review of the collaborative governance literature, it asks to what extent have these initiatives engaged actors from different (vertical) levels and to what extent have they successfully incorporatedhorizontal (non-governmental) actors in horizontal networks? In doing so, what role has the objective ofeconomic development playedin specific arrangements, what are the concrete measuresplanned and implemented, what are the outcomes,andwhat can be learnedfrom this experiencefor the development of collaborative multi-level governance arrangements?The key proposition of the paper is that there is much to learn from past attempts at collaborativeurbangovernance,both in terms of failures and successes. The experienceofcomplexcross-jurisdictional and cross-sectoralgovernance settingsmakes thempotential role modelsfor innovative economicdevelopment policies. At the same time,practical obstacles and failures to live up to expectationsalso show their value as both negative and positive precedents.

Keywords
regional development
National Category
Public Administration Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39766 (URN)
Conference
5th ReHi workshop: A historical perspective on multi-level urban economic development policy. Paisley, Scotland. November 29-30, 2018.
Available from: 2019-06-14 Created: 2019-06-14 Last updated: 2019-09-24
Svensson, S. (2018). Euroregions: Institutional transfer and reinterpreted norms in Central and Eastern Europe (1ed.). In: Agnes Batory, Andrew Cartwright & Diane Stone (Ed.), Policy Experiments, Failures and Innovations: Beyond Accession in Central and Eastern Europe (pp. 131-151). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Euroregions: Institutional transfer and reinterpreted norms in Central and Eastern Europe
2018 (English)In: Policy Experiments, Failures and Innovations: Beyond Accession in Central and Eastern Europe / [ed] Agnes Batory, Andrew Cartwright & Diane Stone, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018, 1, p. 131-151Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A new type of institution that appeared in post-communist Europe in the 1990s was the “Euroregion,” an association between local or regional authorities located close to a national border in two or more European countries. Most Euroregions in Central and Eastern Europe were modeled closely upon Western European examples, but the chapter argues that the motivations of the stakeholders at national and local government levels have become more important for the understanding and impact of these institutions than the original policy ideas behind the transferred institution, potentially leading to counter-productive effects in certain areas, such as the creation of nationality-transcending European identities. Whether the transfer (and translation) of this particular institution is judged as “failure,” “conflicted success” or “precarious success” is to some degree “in the eye of the beholder,” whether that be a transnational actor or a local agent.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018 Edition: 1
Series
New horizons in public policy
Keywords
Centraleuropa, Ungern, euroregioner, gränsområden
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39276 (URN)10.4337/9781785367496.00014 (DOI)2-s2.0-85047943345 (Scopus ID)9781785367489 (ISBN)9781785367496 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-04-26 Created: 2019-04-26 Last updated: 2019-04-29Bibliographically approved
Svensson, S. & Balogh, P. (2018). Limits to Integration: Persisting Border Obstacles in the EU. In: Eduardo Medeiros (Ed.), European Territorial Cooperation: Theoretical and Empirical Approaches to the Process and Impacts of Cross-Border and Transnational Cooperation in Europe (pp. 115-134). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Limits to Integration: Persisting Border Obstacles in the EU
2018 (English)In: European Territorial Cooperation: Theoretical and Empirical Approaches to the Process and Impacts of Cross-Border and Transnational Cooperation in Europe / [ed] Eduardo Medeiros, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 115-134Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This chapter explores the various ways in which borders act as barriers and obstacles in the European Union, and why borders maintain this function even in a context of openness. While most formal barriers to the mobility of goods, capital, services, and labour (i.e. the “four freedoms”) have by now been removed within the European Union, the effects of borders persist. For people living close to borders, these function as obstacles that are related to communication and infrastructure, legal and administrative differences, as well as language and culture. Opinion polls and consultations with European stakeholders witness the importance of addressing regulatory (legal and administrative) obstacles, especially in the fields of labour and education, while language is an important obstacle where more could be done. The chapter finishes with policy recommendations to practitioners seeking to conduct and/or improve systematic policy work to remove border obstacles for enhanced territorial cohesion and regional development. © Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2018
Series
Urban Book Series, ISSN 2365-757X, E-ISSN 2365-7588
Keywords
Border obstacles, Cross-Border cooperation, Border barriers, Cross-Border commuters, EU borders
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39275 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-74887-0_7 (DOI)2-s2.0-85060576432 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-74886-3 (ISBN)978-3-319-74887-0 (ISBN)
Note

Funding: In the case of author Péter Balogh, research for this publication has been supported by National Research, Development and Innovation Office—NKFIH grant #NN 114468 (Change and Continuity in Hungarian Spatial Imaginaries: Nationality, Territoriality, Development and the Politics of Borders).

Available from: 2019-04-26 Created: 2019-04-26 Last updated: 2019-04-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4759-7505

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